Tag: genomics

Bioethics News

Ten years since the discovery of iPS cells. The current state of their clinical application

Photo Neurons derived from human iPS cells Stem Cells Australia

Background

Few biomedical discoveries in recent decades have raised so many expectations as the achievement of adult reprogrammed cells or induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells.1

Pluripotent cells are obtained from adult cells from various tissues that, after genetic reprogramming, can dedifferentiate to a pluripotency state similar to that of embryonic cells, which allows for subsequent differentiation into different cell strains.2,3

In our opinion, this discovery is relevant not only to biomedical issues but also to ethical ones, given that iPS cells could replace human embryonic stem cells (see HERE) – whose use raises numerous ethical problems – in biomedical experimentation and in clinical practice. However, after the last 10 years, the use of iPS cells has still not been clarified. A number of expectations have been met, but other mainly clinical expectations are still far from being achieved.

Current research limitations with iPS cells

There is a notable low efficacy in the techniques employed for obtaining a sufficient proportion of iPS cells, which represents a difficulty in its clinical application.4  Another limitation is the incomplete reprogramming, which depends on the type of cell employed,5 and the problems of mutagenesis resulting from inserting exogenous transcription-factor coding genes, which can cause tumors in the employed cells used.6 Recent studies aim to mitigate this effect.7 A clinical trial for treating macular degeneration with retinal pigment epithelium cells derived from autologously obtained iPS cells has recently been halted.8 After an initially successful experience with the first treated patient, the genetic sequencing of the iPS cells obtained from the second patient revealed mutations in 3 different genes, one of which was classified as oncogene in the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

Research Ethics Roundup: Nature Argues Against Research Censorship, New Comparative Genetics Study, WHO Considers Deploying Experimental Ebola Vaccine, Majority of Completed Stem Cell Clinical Trials Never Published

This week’s Research Ethics Roundup highlights a Nature editorial that encourages researchers to push back against both public and private forms of censorship in research contracts, the National Institute of Health (NIH)’s Comparative Genomics Branch issues new study with implications for both human and dog disease research, the World Health Organization (WHO) speaks with Doctors Without Borders about using an experimental vaccine to target a new Ebola outbreak, and bioethicists’ concern about stem cell researchers’ failure to publish study results including discoveries on side effects.

The post Research Ethics Roundup: Nature Argues Against Research Censorship, New Comparative Genetics Study, WHO Considers Deploying Experimental Ebola Vaccine, Majority of Completed Stem Cell Clinical Trials Never Published appeared first on Ampersand.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

Poster Spotlight: Lessons Learned from the Development of a Specialized IRB for Genetic and Genomic Research

Poster presenters at our annual conferences often continue their research or program long after the event. Read on for more from Deirdre Lombardi, MPH, CPH, CHES, Challace Pahlevan-Ibrekic, CIP, MS, Brenda Ruotolo, BA, CIP, and Alan Teller, CIP, who presented a poster titled Development of a Specialized IRB for Genetics and Genomics Research, at the 2016 Advancing Ethical Research Conference (AER16).

The post Poster Spotlight: Lessons Learned from the Development of a Specialized IRB for Genetic and Genomic Research appeared first on Ampersand.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

Creative Minds: Studying the Human Genome in 3D

Jesse Dixon

As a kid, Jesse Dixon often listened to his parents at the dinner table discussing how to run experiments and their own research laboratories. His father Jack is an internationally renowned biochemist and the former vice president and chief scientific officer of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. His mother Claudia Kent Dixon, now retired, did groundbreaking work in the study of lipid molecules that serve as the building blocks of cell membranes.

So, when Jesse Dixon set out to pursue a career, he followed in his parents’ footsteps and chose science. But Dixon, a researcher at the Salk Institute, La Jolla, CA, has charted a different research path by studying genomics, with a focus on understanding chromosomal structure. Dixon has now received a 2016 NIH Director’s Early Independence Award to study the three-dimensional organization of the genome, and how changes in its structure might contribute to diseases such as cancer or even to physical differences among people.

The human body is made up of trillions of cells, each much too small to see without a microscope. And yet, if you could unwind and stretch the DNA contained within the nucleus of any one of those vanishingly small cells, you’d find it’s more than 6 feet long!

How is that possible? It takes a lot of careful folding and packaging. It also requires that the genome is arranged to ensure that the right genes are activated in the right place and at the right time. That’s because DNA is not a disorganized mass of spaghetti in the nucleus.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

In the Journals – April 2017 by Danya Glabau

Critical Public Health

On difference and doubt as tools for critical engagement with public health

Catherine M. Will

This paper argues that critical public health should reengage with public health as practice by drawing on versions of Science and Technology Studies (STS) that ‘de-centre the human’ and by seeking alternative forms of critique to work inspired by Foucault. Based on close reading of work by Annemarie Mol, John Law, Vicky Singleton and others, I demonstrate that these authors pursue a conversation with Foucault but suggest new approaches to studying contemporary public health work in different settings. Proposing that we ‘doubt’ both the unity of public health and its effects, I argue that this version of STS opens up a space to recognise multiplicity; to avoid idealising what is being criticised; and to celebrate or care for public health practices as part of critique. Finally I oppose the view that considering technologies, materials and microbes leads to micro-level analysis or political neutrality, and suggest that it allows us to reframe studies of public health to account for inequalities and to draw attention to weak or retreating states, active markets and the entangled relations of humans and non-humans across the world.

 

Biopolitical precarity in the permeable body: the social lives of people, viruses and their medicines

Elizabeth Mills

This article is based on multi-sited ethnography that traced a dynamic network of actors (activists, policy-makers, health care systems, pharmaceutical companies) and actants (viruses and medicines) that shaped South African women’s access to, and embodiment of, antiretroviral therapies (ARVs).

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

Dueling BRCA Databases: What About the Patient?

The news release Monday morning grabbed my attention:

“Study finds wide gap in quality of BRCA1/2 variant
classification between Myriad Genetics and a common public database.”

Myriad Genetics had been exclusively providing tests, for
$3000+ a pop for full BRCA gene sequencing, for 17 years before the Supreme
Court invalidated key gene patents back in 2013. Since the ruling a dozen or so
competitors have been offering tests for much lower prices. Meanwhile, Myriad
has amassed a far deeper database than anyone else, having been in the business
so much longer. And it’s proprietary.

CLASSIFYING GENE VARIANTS

(NHGRI)

Public databases of variants of health-related genes have
been around for years too. The best known, ClinVar, collects and curates data
from the biomedical literature, expert panels, reports at meetings, testing
laboratories, and individual researchers, without access to Myriad’s database.
ClinVar uses several standard technical criteria to classify variants as
“pathogenic,” “benign,” or “of uncertain significance.” (“Likely pathogenic”
and “likely benign” were used more in the past.)

ClinVar lists 5400 variants just for BRCA1. The criteria
come from population statistics, how a particular mutation alters the encoded
protein, effects on the phenotype (symptoms), and other information.
Bioinformatics meets biochemistry to predict susceptibility. The BRCA1 protein
acts as a hub of sorts where many other proteins that control DNA repair
gather. DNA Science discussed the genes behind breast and ovarian cancers here.

As gene sequences accumulate in the databases and troops of
geneticists and genetic counselors annotate them, the proportion of pathogenic
and benign entries will increase as that of the unsettling “variants of
uncertain significance” — VUS — will decrease.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

Dueling BRCA Databases: What About the Patient?

The news release Monday morning grabbed my attention:

“Study finds wide gap in quality of BRCA1/2 variant
classification between Myriad Genetics and a common public database.”

Myriad Genetics had been exclusively providing tests, for
$3000+ a pop for full BRCA gene sequencing, for 17 years before the Supreme
Court invalidated key gene patents back in 2013. Since the ruling a dozen or so
competitors have been offering tests for much lower prices. Meanwhile, Myriad
has amassed a far deeper database than anyone else, having been in the business
so much longer. And it’s proprietary.

CLASSIFYING GENE VARIANTS

(NHGRI)

Public databases of variants of health-related genes have
been around for years too. The best known, ClinVar, collects and curates data
from the biomedical literature, expert panels, reports at meetings, testing
laboratories, and individual researchers, without access to Myriad’s database.
ClinVar uses several standard technical criteria to classify variants as
“pathogenic,” “benign,” or “of uncertain significance.” (“Likely pathogenic”
and “likely benign” were used more in the past.)

ClinVar lists 5400 variants just for BRCA1. The criteria
come from population statistics, how a particular mutation alters the encoded
protein, effects on the phenotype (symptoms), and other information.
Bioinformatics meets biochemistry to predict susceptibility. The BRCA1 protein
acts as a hub of sorts where many other proteins that control DNA repair
gather. DNA Science discussed the genes behind breast and ovarian cancers here.

As gene sequences accumulate in the databases and troops of
geneticists and genetic counselors annotate them, the proportion of pathogenic
and benign entries will increase as that of the unsettling “variants of
uncertain significance” — VUS — will decrease.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

In the Journals–March 2017, Part I by Julia Kowalski

Here is Part I of our March article round-up.

American Anthropologist

A Dog’s Life: Suffering Humanitarianism in Port-au-Prince, Haiti

Greg Beckett

In the Bel Air neighborhood of Port-au-Prince, Haiti, most residents are dependent on humanitarian and foreign assistance for food, services, aid, and jobs. Yet, some residents feel that the conditions under which such aid is provided actively blocks their ability to live a life they find meaningful. In this article, I explore how some Haitians theorize this humanitarian condition through the figure of the dog, an animal that exemplifies, for Haitians, the deep history of violence, dehumanization, and degradation associated with foreign rule. I then contrast this with how foreign aid workers invoke the figure of the dog to illustrate their compassionate care for suffering others. Drawing on research among Bel Air residents and foreign aid workers in the years after a devastating earthquake destroyed much of Port-au-Prince, I show how the figure of the dog is central both to Haitian critiques of humanitarian aid and to the international humanitarian imaginary that responds to forms of suffering it deems cruel.

Biosocieties

“Let’s pull these technologies out of the ivory tower”: The politics, ethos, and ironies of participant-driven genomic research

Michelle L. McGowan, Suparna Choudhury, Eric T. Juengst, Marcie Lambrix, Richard A. Settersten Jr., Jennifer R. Fishman

This paper investigates how groups of ‘citizen scientists’ in non-traditional settings and primarily online networks claim to be challenging conventional genomic research processes and norms. Although these groups are highly diverse, they all distinguish their efforts from traditional university- or industry-based genomic research as being ‘participant-driven’ in one way or another.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

Bioethics & Wine

I
never thought I’d have the opportunity to use this blog title. Never, that is,
until I stumbled across a company called
Vinome, a California
start-up that offers a curated wine service based on a customer’s individual
taste profile. What makes this wine subscription service unique is not its
price (although, at around
$65 a bottle, it’s just a
bit outside of the typical price-per-bottle for many wine club members). At
Vinome, your taste profile includes not only a list of questions about your
preferences, but also information from DNA sequencing from the saliva sample
you provide to the company. The company website proclaims this is “A little
science and a lot of fun,” but
experts are skeptical about whether
there is any science involved at all.

Holding
aside the question of scientific plausibility, companies touting
direct-to-consumer genetic screening for ancestry, medical issues, or just
plain fun include information in the fine print that would give any bioethicist
pause. While the Vinome website requires patrons to check the box indicating “I
have read and understand the Vinome Informed Consent” prior to ordering, that “informed
consent” is only available if the customer
voluntarily
clicks on the informed consent link. Buried at the bottom of the informed
consent screen is a sentence that reads:

 

“You allow
Vinome to retain your data as part of Vinome’s secure research database, for
use by Vinome or its research affiliates, in an effort to improve and expand
services. If any commercial product is developed as a result of the use of your
data, there will be no financial benefit to you.”

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

Bioethics & Wine

I
never thought I’d have the opportunity to use this blog title. Never, that is,
until I stumbled across a company called
Vinome, a California
start-up that offers a curated wine service based on a customer’s individual
taste profile. What makes this wine subscription service unique is not its
price (although, at around
$65 a bottle, it’s just a
bit outside of the typical price-per-bottle for many wine club members). At
Vinome, your taste profile includes not only a list of questions about your
preferences, but also information from DNA sequencing from the saliva sample
you provide to the company. The company website proclaims this is “A little
science and a lot of fun,” but
experts are skeptical about whether
there is any science involved at all.

Holding
aside the question of scientific plausibility, companies touting
direct-to-consumer genetic screening for ancestry, medical issues, or just
plain fun include information in the fine print that would give any bioethicist
pause. While the Vinome website requires patrons to check the box indicating “I
have read and understand the Vinome Informed Consent” prior to ordering, that “informed
consent” is only available if the customer
voluntarily
clicks on the informed consent link. Buried at the bottom of the informed
consent screen is a sentence that reads:

 

“You allow
Vinome to retain your data as part of Vinome’s secure research database, for
use by Vinome or its research affiliates, in an effort to improve and expand
services. If any commercial product is developed as a result of the use of your
data, there will be no financial benefit to you.”

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.