Category: Bioethics News

Bioethics News

For Doctors, A Clamp Down On Visas Could Have An Uneven Effect In The U.S.

Limiting the number of foreign doctors who can get visas to practice in the United States could have a significant impact on certain hospitals and states that rely on them, according to a new study

Source: Bioethics Bulletin by the Berman Institute of Bioethics.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics News

For Many at Johns Hopkins, the Defense of Science is a Cause They Can Rally Behind

JHU faculty, staff, students discuss their plans to participate in Saturday’s March for Science in Washington, D.C.

Source: Bioethics Bulletin by the Berman Institute of Bioethics.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics News

A Lesson From the Henrietta Lacks Story: Science Needs Your Cells

It’s often portrayed as a story of exploitation. Henrietta Lacks, a poor, young African-American woman, learned she had terminal cancer. Cells collected from a biopsy of her cancer were cultured without her knowledge or permission to develop a cell line, called HeLa. Over the ensuing decades, research using HeLa cells led to scores of medical advances, saving lives — and making a lot of money for a lot of people, though not for Ms. Lacks’s family

Source: Bioethics Bulletin by the Berman Institute of Bioethics.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics News

Could the Henrietta Lacks Case Still Happen?

What happened in the 1951 case of Henrietta Lacks, and could it happen again today? The story of the woman who unwittingly spurred a scientific bonanza made for a best-selling book in 2010. On Saturday, it returns in an HBO film with Oprah Winfrey portraying Lacks’ daughter Deborah. With comments from our Jeffrey Kahn

Source: Bioethics Bulletin by the Berman Institute of Bioethics.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics News

Henrietta Lacks Film Highlights Important Issues, Johns Hopkins History

Johns Hopkins leaders sent a message to the JHU and Hopkins Medicine communities today about an upcoming HBO film, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks. The film is based on the best-selling book about the life of a woman who was treated for cervical cancer at The Johns Hopkins Hospital in the 1950s

Source: Bioethics Bulletin by the Berman Institute of Bioethics.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics News

Disclosure, Doctors and Social Media

As doctors and health professionals take to public spaces like Twitter and Facebook to curate and create we face new challenges. One of the challenges is how to disclose our relationship to the organizations and products. How do we disclose conflict of interest in so many different kinds of venues?

Source: Bioethics Bulletin by the Berman Institute of Bioethics.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics News

Open ethical debate: Are gene editing techniques ethical in reproductive medicine?

Author’s opinion: The use of these techniques is currently medically and ethically unjustifiable.

The United Kingdom has recently approved mitochondrial transfer (3 parents children) to prevent the development of mitochondrial diseases in the children of mothers affected by these types of conditions (See HERE). This has opened an ethical debate on the use of such techniques, especially if they can modify the germline.

Now, a recent article has addressed their use in the field of reproductive medicine and discussed their use in infertility treatment and disease prevention (see HERE).

It is well known that the efficacy of assisted reproduction techniques is limited, with pregnancy rates when in vitro fertilisation is used of 29.1% per aspiration cycle and 33.2% per embryo transferred; when intracytoplasmic sperm injection is used, these rates are 27.9% and 31.8%, respectively.

It is therefore thought that identifying possible genetic abnormalities and then applying personalised medicine could improve these figures. It is also believed that they could help to resolve human infertility, since half of the cases are thought to be due to a genetic cause, and could be remedied by correcting the corresponding mutation responsible for infertility using genome editing. This has already been applied in different cases of genetic mutations in sperm in the case of azoospermia.

Gene editing in reproductive medicine

However, in the author’s opinion, the use of these techniques is currently medically and ethically unjustifiable for three reasons. First of all, there is still very little experience in genetic modification in humans, as fewer than ten products have been approved for use in these diseases.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics News

Why Is The Brain Prone to Florid Forms of Confabulation?

She had visited Madonna’s mansion the week before, Maggie told me during my ward round. Helped her choose outfits for the tour. The only problem was that Maggie was a seamstress in Dublin. She had never met Madonna; she had never provided her with sartorial advice on cone brassieres

Source: Bioethics Bulletin by the Berman Institute of Bioethics.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics News

Can Parents Sue If Their Kid Is Born With the ‘Wrong’ DNA?

It’s a nightmare scenario straight out of a primetime drama: a child-seeking couple visits a fertility clinic to try their luck with in-vitro fertilization, only to wind up accidentally impregnated by the wrong sperm

Source: Bioethics Bulletin by the Berman Institute of Bioethics.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics News

Food Security & Nutrition in Timor-Leste

Q&A with Becky McLaren

 

Can you briefly describe the Timor-Leste project and your recent visit to the country?

 

The project is a strategic review of the food security and nutrition situation in Timor-Leste. We’re working with the World Food Programme, which has done similar work in other countries. We’re evaluating what’s been done in the past and what’s currently going on in order to make recommendations for future work. Our review is framed around the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), specifically SDG 2 which aims to end hunger worldwide by 2030.

 

Our recent trip was an opportunity to develop relationships with our different collaborators, including our main partner in the review, CEPAD; build an outline for the project’s next steps; and meet other stakeholders – government, international and local NGOs, and civil society organizations.

 

Can you tell us about some of the unique nutrition and food security challenges facing Timor-Leste?

 

Timor-Leste is a post-conflict country which is still in the window of peacebuilding and becoming more stable. The country was colonized by Portugal until 1975 and then occupied by Indonesia until the UN helped it achieve independence in 2002. There was a reemergence of conflict in 2006, and UN peacekeepers maintained a presence in Timor-Leste until 2012. At the present, the country has a unique opportunity to move beyond creating a stable government and into building food and nutrition security. The government has the chance to restructure the agriculture and food systems.

 

Timor-Leste also has serious nutrition challenges, with one of the highest stunting rates in the world.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.