Bioethics Blogs

Lessons from the West African Ebola epidemic

Conventional wisdom—and an article in the Journal of Medical Ethics reviewed on this blog two years ago—advise that health research should not be conducted during times of crisis. Yes, such conditions compromise the controlled environments that studies typically require to produce reliable results, but they can also threaten the ethical integrity of research. Without institutional mechanisms to hold them accountable, investigators may cut corners, violate standards of privacy and informed consent, and even endanger participants. Disruption in the normal function of medical services can also apply pressure on individuals unable to access care by traditional means to seek it out by participating in risky research. And even if one assumes that researchers display honesty beyond reproach, it is still unreasonable to expect that they would be able to keep their cool in the midst of widespread panic and social collapse. But there is a fly in the ointment, at least when it comes to crises caused by epidemics. Public health organizations are first-responders at these moments, but they would be dead in the water without relevant data collected under real-world conditions to guide their actions. In this situation, the precautionary principle alone is not enough to stop a study altogether. In fact, it could be argued that an absolute prohibition against biomedical research in such situations may itself be unethical. The question then becomes, not whether, but how to guarantee ethical research during outbreaks?

The Ethics Review Board (ERB) of Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) had to contend with this question during the 2014 Ebola epidemic. They recently chronicled their experience in the April issue of Public Health Ethics.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.