Bioethics News

More gay couples using surrogates in US

An informal study by a fertility data service suggests an increasing number of gay couples in the US are turning to surrogacy.

The study — conducted by Fertility IQ on behalf of the Chicago Tribune — involved data from fertility clinics in more than 10 cities.

The results, as reported in the Tribune, “indicate that 10 to 20 percent of donor eggs are going to gay men having babies via surrogacy, and in a lot of places the numbers are up 50 percent from five years ago.”

Surrogacy for gay men in the US was “unheard of” five years ago, according to Eve Feinberg, an assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine.

But Jake Anderson, Fertility IQ co-founder, says the practice will become increasingly common.

“We think this is going to be pretty darn commonplace…Maybe not tomorrow, but five years from now, 10 years from now, everybody will know a few people who have built their families through gay surrogacy.”

Surrogacy for gay men typically costs between $100,000 to $200,000, Anderson told the Tribune.

Statistics released earlier this year by the Treasury Department indicate that the income of same-sex married male couples with children is roughly $275,000 on average, more than double the pretax income for heterosexual couples and same-sex married female couples with children.

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