Bioethics Blogs

This Is How Prince’s Death Begins Conversation About Addiction

Myra Christopher
INTRODUCTORY NOTE FROM MYRA CHRISTOPHER
Lynn Webster, author of the blog below, is a member of Pain Action Alliance to Implement a National Strategy (PAINS) Steering Committee. He is also one of the most authoritative and committed experts in the United States working on both pain and addition. PAINS has been benefitted tremendously from his involvement in our efforts to “transform the way pain is perceived, judged and treated.” 
Over the last couple of years, PAINS has come to understand the importance of embracing the need for dramatic change in the way two diseases – chronic pain and substance abuse disorders, especially opioid addiction — are addressed, and that by advocates focused on both working together, we are far more likely to improve the health and well-being of all Americans.  
Although relationship the between these two public issues is not yet clearly understood, there is without question a correlation between the two. Unfortunately, these two patient populations have often been pitted against one another by the media and fear-mongers for personal or political advantage. PAINS has attempted to reach out to those focused on opioid addiction and to neutralize some of the ill-will between those focused on pain and those focused on addiction.  
These efforts are  gaining some traction with people of goodwill – no matter their primary locus of concern; PAINS is committed to this work because we are confident that there are shared values and common ground upon which we can collaborate.
We are grateful to Dr. Webster for allowing us to post a blog he wrote shortly after the sudden death of one of America’s great artists, Prince.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.