Bioethics Blogs

New Book: The Ethics Rupture

The University of Toronto Press has published The Ethics Rupture: Exploring Alternatives to Formal Research-Ethics Review, edited by Will C. van den Hoonaard and Ann Hamilton. My chapter is entitled, “Ethical Pluralism: Scholarly Societies and the Regulation of Research Ethics.”

The full contents are as follows:

INTRODUCTION

The Ethics Rupture Summit in the Context of Current Trends in Research-Ethics Review – Will C. van den Hoonaard and Ann Hamilton

I. STRAINS IN RESEARCH-ETHICS REVIEW PROCESSES

1. The Social Costs of Ethics Regulation – Robert Dingwall

2. Fieldwork Double-Bound in Human Research-Ethics Reviews: Disciplinary Competence, or Regulatory Compliance and the Muting of Disciplinary Values – Rena Lederman

3. IRBan Renewal – Patti A. Adler and Peter Adler

4. The Language of Ethics: How Ethics Review Creates Inequalities for Language Minorities in Research – Laura Stark

5. Uncomfortable Truths, Ethics, and Qualitative Research: Escaping from the Dominance of Informed Consent – Marco Marzano

6. Assessing Risk in Psychological Research – Patrick O’Neill

II. OUTSIDE THE COMFORT ZONE: NEW METHODOLOGIES

7. The Internet as a Stage: Dramaturgy, Research-Ethics Boards, and Privacy as Performance – Heather Kitchin Dahringer

8. Research Ethics Boards: Are They Ready for Autoethnography? – B. Lee Murray

9. (Re)Framing Research Ethics Through Communication: A Collective and Collaborative Approach to Research-Ethics Review – Julie Bull

III. ANALYSIS OF CHANGE: WHEN SUPERFICIALITY DISPLACES SUBSTANCE

10. The More Things Change, the More They Stay the Same: The TCPS 2 and the Institutional Oversight of Social Science Research in Canada – Kirsten Bell

11. Should Data Sharing be Regulated? – Natasha S.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.