Bioethics Blogs

The Year in Bioethics That Was – 2015

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Happy New Year. As has become a tradition at the bioethics.net blogs, the ending of one year and beginning of another is a time for reflection, for reviewing that year that has passed and planning for the year to come.

In 2015, bioethics.net is pleased to have had 18 bloggers contribute to our 99 posts. A very big thank you to these insightful scholars: Alison Bateman-House, Jennifer Blumenthal-Barby, Arthur Caplan, Nanette Elster, Joseph Fins, Bela Fishbeyn, Ellen Fox, Macey Henderson, Lisa Kearns, Jenna Lillemoe, Kayhan Parsi, Keisha Ray, Jeanie Sauderland, Charles Seife, Adil Shamoo, Christopher Thomas Scott, and Amanda Zink. Their insights, reporting, and reflection on the big topics and ideas of this past year helped enrich the bioethics conversation.

While most of our blogs are complex, covering multiple topics, for the purposes of looking at the themes in the 2014 blogs, each post was placed in only one category.

  • Politics/Policy/Law – 11 posts
  • Research Ethics – 9 posts
  • Public Health – 8 posts
  • Media – 8 posts
  • Medical Professionalism – 7 posts
  • End of Life – 6 posts
  • Bioethics Professionalism – 5 posts
  • Philosophy – 5 posts
  • Children – 4posts
  • Data Science – 4 posts
  • Transplants/Donations – 4 posts
  • Education – 4 posts
  • Sports – 3 posts
  • Clinical Ethics – 2 posts
  • Planned Parenthood – 2 posts
  • Torture/War – 2 posts
  • Genetics – 2 posts
  • Drugs/Pharma – 2 posts
  • Race/Discrimination – 2 posts
  • AJOB Editorial – 1 post
  • Beginning of Life – 1 post
  • Disability – 1 post
  • Guns – 1 post
  • Obituary – 1 post
  • Technology – 1 post
  • Parenthood – 1 post
  • Year in review – 1 post

In a year that saw the launch of the 2016 Presidential campaign it is no surprise that Politics/Policy/Law were the most popular topics.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.