Bioethics Blogs

The End of Meaningful Use: A Meaningful Opportunity

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Acting Administrator Andy Slavitt said Monday that 2016 would likely see the end of the meaningful use program. Meaningful use is a carrot-and-stick government program designed to get medical providers to use electronic health records (EHRs) and to set standards for using them. The carrot: medical providers who show compliance with meaningful use regulations get incentive payments from the government. The stick: those who do not are assessed financial penalties (257,000 received penalties in 2015).

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The latest Mayo Clinic study on physician burnout shows that in 2014, 54.4% of physicians admitted to at least one symptom of burnout. This is up from 45.5% in 2011. In the non-physician population, the number is about 25%.

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Why the burnout? Lots of reasons, but a major one is that many doctors are spending a lot of time doing things that are not just peripheral to what we went into medicine for, but inimical to it.

When I decided to go into medicine almost thirty years ago, I wanted to do work that didn’t involve sitting in front of a computer all day. My father was a computer systems analyst, and while he brought home cool stuff from the office, I wanted to work with people. So I chose medicine. And somewhere along the way, something changed.

Like many doctors, over the years I found myself spending more and more of my patient care time staring into a computer screen. This in and of itself might not have been so bad, except that it was time taken away from the time I used to spend looking at my patients: looking them in the eye, observing the subtleties of their body language, watching how they breathe or fidget or tremor.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.