Bioethics Blogs

These Americans Are Rich – Should We Celebrate?

American manufacturing has declined precipitously in the past few decades. Companies that were once the source of fabulous wealth for Americans – the U.S. Steel profits that enriched the Carnegie family, the Ford Motor F -1.29% Company profits that enriched its eponymous family – are now struggling to keep up with foreign competitors.

Thank God for American pharmaceutical companies, which are a rare source of wealth in United States. The CEO of Eli Lilly , John Lechleiter, made $11.2 million in take-home pay in 2013. That was dwarfed by the $18.1 million pay package of Richard Gonzalez of AbbVie ABBV +0.24%, which still couldn’t compete with the $20.5 million that Miles White made running AbbVie’s former parent company, Abbott. And Pharma isn’t just a source of hefty c-suite income. Senior chemists at pharmaceutical companies bring in a median salary of $76,000 while senior biostatisticians make around $135,000. Drive through beautiful suburban neighborhoods in Jersey, Indianapolis, and Raleigh-Durham, and you are witnessing the benefits of this thriving industry.

I’m really glad the American pharmaceutical industry is a success. So why did a recent conversation I had with a retired pharmaceutical executive end with him storming away after proclaiming: “I’m sure glad you’re not a member of Congress!”?

Let me explain. (To read the rest of this article, please visit Forbes.)

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.