Bioethics Blogs

Child Euthanasia: Should We Just not Talk about It?

Guest Post by Luc Bovens

In 2014 Belgium passed a law that extends its euthanasia legislation to minors.  There were strong parliamentary majorities in favour of this law but nonetheless a scream of “Murderers!” was heard in the public galleries of the Chamber of Representatives.  What is the opposition like in Belgium?

Euthanasia for adults has been legal in Belgium since 2002.  Many opponents of this legislation, including the Catholic Church, abhor the decision to further extend this legislation to minors.  I do not engage with the legalisation of euthanasia in general.  What I am asking is whether, considering that euthanasia is legal, it is or is not reasonable to limit the legislation to adults only.  This is a separate moral question.  One may be an opponent of a particular practice, yet at the same time believe that, if the practice is legalised, then it would be wrong to restrict the legalisation to a particular subgroup.   (Likewise, one may be an opponent of, say, legislation permitting abortion, and yet, if abortion is legalised, oppose a restriction that would make it accessible to only certain sectors of society.)  I distinguish between two lines of opposition that focus on the extension of the euthanasia legislation to minors in the Belgian debate.

First, there is an Open Letter signed by (mostly) paediatricians and there are various arguments in the press against the extension of the legislation: We should never grant euthanasia requests to minors, because such decisions are too weighty for minors, minors are not capable of discernment, the pressure on minors is too great, minors are particularly sensitive to such pressure, and there is sufficient palliative care for minors.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.