Bioethics Blogs

A Tipping Point on Human Germline Modification?

In a March 5 expose in MIT Technology Review titled “Engineering the Perfect Baby,” Antonio Regalado reported on just how close some scientists are to using the precision gene editing technique CRISPR to modify nuclear DNA within human gametes or embryos. A week later, an article in Nature alluded to rumors that this has already been done, and that papers reporting on it will be published shortly.

This startling news has prompted statements about human germline modification from three different groups of scientists so far: one published in Nature, one in Science, and one released by the International Society for Stem Cell Research. All discourage clinical applications and call for public dialogue and debate to acknowledge the profound societal, policy, ethical and safety implications raised by efforts to control the genes we pass on to future generations – a welcome sign from within the scientific community. But the statements offer a range of different paths forward.

A Center for Genetics and Society press statement released this morning supports the call for a moratorium on human germline gene editing. CGS opposes efforts to create genetically altered human beings, and has long advocated that the United States join the 40+ other countries that already prohibit this.

The proposal for the strongest moratorium came from scientists writing in Nature under the clear headline “Don’t edit the human germ line.” Their commentary, posted on March 12, calls for “a voluntary moratorium in the scientific community” to discourage human germline modification and to raise public awareness of the critical difference between gene editing in somatic cells and in germ cells.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.