Bioethics Blogs

Cloning and the Lessons of "Overparenting"

Tonight, HBO is premiering a new episode of its State of Play series on sports. This new installment is called “Trophy Kids” and its focus is the tendency among some parents — in this case, the parents of student-athletes — to live vicariously through their children. Here’s a teaser-trailer:

Of course, the phenomenon of parental overinvolvement and inappropriate emotional investment isn’t limited to sports and athletics. It can happen with just about any childhood activity or hobby — from schoolwork to scouting, from music to beauty pageants (Toddlers and Tiaras, anyone?). The anecdotal stories can be astonishing; it would be interesting to see what psychologists, therapists, and social scientists have had to say about this.

All of which brings to mind the debates over human cloning. Way back in 2010, we here at Futurisms tussled with a few other bloggers about the ethics of cloning. We were disturbed, among other things, by the way that cloning advocates blithely want to remake procreation, parenthood, and the relationship between the generations. As the phenomenon depicted in this HBO program suggests, many parents already have a strong desire to treat their children’s childhoods as opportunities to relive, perfect, or redeem their own. Imagine how much more powerful that desire would be if the children in question were clones — willfully created genetic copies.

In its 2002 report Human Cloning and Human Dignity, the President’s Council on Bioethics attempted to think about procreation and cloning in part by contrasting two ways of thinking about children — as “gifts” or as “products of our will”:

Gifts and blessings we learn to accept as gratefully as we can.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.