Bioethics Blogs

Applying Comparative Effectiveness Research To Individuals: Problems And Approaches

A Comparative Effectiveness Research (CER) study shows that surgery is better than medical treatment for a particular cardiac condition. My patient is 78 years old and has complicated diabetes. – does the study apply? Another patient 48 years old and otherwise healthy. Does it apply here?

Can the overall results of a CER study be applied to all patients in the target population? Are there substantial, undetected variations among patients in the results of CER? What is the extent of exceptions? These are important policy questions in applying results of CER to day-to-day decisions, clinical guidelines, performance measures and other facets of the modern healthcare system.

The “gold standard” approach to CER is the randomized (RCT), a scientific comparison of two or more clinical strategies, with the downsides that it is generally conducted in a special environment and usually has a rather narrow (and possibly unrepresentative) population spectrum. Two variants, the Practical (or Pragmatic) Clinical Trial (PCT) and the Large Simple Trial (LST) are inclusive of a wider spectrum of patients and more diverse clinical settings.

These approaches provide “average” results and for the most part it is thought that averages do apply to a large segment of the population at large for which they are intended. However, there are clearly differences in effect (heterogeneities of treatment effect – HTE’s) that manifest among CER study subjects and presumably to a greater extent in the intended population outside the study. Two approaches may be equivalent on the average but one may be better in a particular group, and differences may be less apparent when the study’s population base is narrow.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.