Tag: world health

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Ebola Virus: Lessons from a Unique Survivor

Caption: Ebola virus (green) is shown on cell surface.
Credit: National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH

There are new reports of an outbreak of Ebola virus disease in the Democratic Republic of Congo. This news comes just two years after international control efforts eventually contained an Ebola outbreak in West Africa, though before control was achieved, more than 11,000 people died—the largest known Ebola outbreak in human history [1]. While considerable progress continues to be made in understanding the infection and preparing for new outbreaks, many questions remain about why some people die from Ebola and others survive.

Now, some answers are beginning to emerge thanks to a new detailed analysis of the immune responses of a unique Ebola survivor, a 34-year-old American health-care worker who was critically ill and cared for at the NIH Special Clinical Studies Unit in 2015 [2]. The NIH-led team used the patient’s blood samples, which were drawn every day, to measure the number of viral particles and monitor how his immune system reacted over the course of his Ebola infection, from early symptoms through multiple organ failures and, ultimately, his recovery.

The researchers identified unexpectedly large shifts in immune responses that preceded observable improvements in the patient’s symptoms. The researchers say that, through further study and close monitoring of such shifts, health care workers may be able to develop more effective ways to care for Ebola patients.

The Ebola virus is a filovirus that can be passed from person to person through direct contact with blood or other bodily fluids.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

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New Health Workforce Action Plan Dodging the Difficult Questions

Mit Ohilips and Marielle Bemelmans of  Médecins Sans Frontières discuss the looming issue of how to afford an expanded health workforce in the countries that need it most The Seventieth World Health Assembly is currently underway

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

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Factory farming, human health, and the new WHO Director General

Last week, over 200 experts called on the next Director General of the World Health Organization to prioritize factory farming in an open letter. Announced in articles in the New York Times and The Lancet, the letter argues that factory farming is a major … Continue reading

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

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Interview with Arthur Caplan

by Kaitlynd Hiller and Rachel F. Bloom

It is a difficult task to succinctly describe the professional accomplishments of Arthur Caplan, PhD. For the uninitiated, Dr. Caplan is perhaps the most prominent voice in the conversation between bioethicists and the general public, as well as being a prolific writer and academic. He is currently the Drs. William F. and Virginia Connolly Mitty Professor of Bioethics at NYU Langone Medical Center and NYU School of Medicine, having founded the Division of Bioethics there in 2012. Additionally, he co-founded the NYU Sports and Society Program, where he currently serves as Dean, and heads the ethics program for NYU’s Global Institute for Public Health. Prior to joining NYU, he created the Center for Bioethics and Department of Medical Ethics at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, serving as the Sidney D. Caplan Professor of Bioethics. Dr. Caplan is a Hastings Center fellow, also holding fellowships at The New York Academy of Medicine, the College of Physicians of Philadelphia, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the American College of Legal Medicine. He received the lifetime achievement award of the American Society of Bioethics and Humanities in 2016.

Dr. Caplan’s experience is not at all limited to the academic realm: he has served on numerous advisory counsels at the national and international level, and is an ethics advisor for organizations tackling issues from synthetic biology to world health to compassionate care. Dr. Caplan has been awarded the McGovern Medal of the American Medical Writers Association, the Franklin Award from the City of Philadelphia, the Patricia Price Browne Prize in Biomedical Ethics, the Public Service Award from the National Science Foundation, and the Rare Impact Award from the National Organization for Rare Disorders; he also holds seven honorary degrees.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

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World Health Organization Elects a New Director General from Ethiopia

On Tuesday, the World Health Organization (WHO) announced that Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, a health expert from Ethiopia, was elected as the new director-general to lead the United Nations agency focused on international public health

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

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Violent Attacks on Health Care Facilities Increased in 2016, Report Finds

In a 48-hour period in November, warplanes bombed five hospitals in Syria, leaving Aleppo’s rebel-controlled section without a functioning hospital. The loss of the Aleppo facilities — which had been handling more than 1,500 major surgeries each month — was just one hit in a series of escalating attacks on health care workers in 2016, the World Health Organization (WHO) reported on Friday

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

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Research Ethics Roundup: Nature Argues Against Research Censorship, New Comparative Genetics Study, WHO Considers Deploying Experimental Ebola Vaccine, Majority of Completed Stem Cell Clinical Trials Never Published

This week’s Research Ethics Roundup highlights a Nature editorial that encourages researchers to push back against both public and private forms of censorship in research contracts, the National Institute of Health (NIH)’s Comparative Genomics Branch issues new study with implications for both human and dog disease research, the World Health Organization (WHO) speaks with Doctors Without Borders about using an experimental vaccine to target a new Ebola outbreak, and bioethicists’ concern about stem cell researchers’ failure to publish study results including discoveries on side effects.

The post Research Ethics Roundup: Nature Argues Against Research Censorship, New Comparative Genetics Study, WHO Considers Deploying Experimental Ebola Vaccine, Majority of Completed Stem Cell Clinical Trials Never Published appeared first on Ampersand.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

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Four Reasons Canada Needs Universal Pharmacare

Steve Morgan gives us four reasons to support universal pharmacare and then invites us to sign the Parliamentary Petition e-959 (Health care services).

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Ontario has just announced that it will offer a publicly funded pharmacare program for children and youth in the province. This is a small step in the right direction, one that is arguably most important for its symbolism in a national debate.

Why just a small step? Because Ontario is adding universal, comprehensive pharmacare coverage to the age group that least uses medicines. Many working-age Ontarians, who are far more likely to require medicines than children, will not be insured.

Why symbolic? Ontario’s new pharmacare program is evidence of at least one government taking responsibility for this component of health care, integrating it with medical and hospital care.

Several national commissions on Canada’s health care system have recommended adding prescription drugs to our publicly funded universal medicare system. To date, however, no federal government has acted on those recommendations.

By creating ‘pharmacare-junior,’ Premier Wynne and Minister Hoskins are, in essence, calling on the federal government to help finish the job by creating a pharmacare program for all Canadians of all ages.

Here are four reasons why Canada needs a universal, public pharmacare program – and what Canadians can do to make it happen.

The most important reason for universal pharmacare in Canada is that access to essential medicines is a human right according to the World Health Organization (WHO). The WHO recommends that countries protect that right in law and with pharmaceutical policies that work in conjunction with their broader systems of universal health coverage.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

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Rise in sexually transmitted diseases according to WHO last report

Experts have warned in the 46th edition of the spanish journal EIDON of an upturn in sexually transmitted diseases, as a result of the social and cultural changes derailing the efforts and decline achieved after the “hardest” years of the HIV epidemic. According to the latest World Health Organization (WHO) report published in August 2016,

  • 131 million people contract chlamydia each year,
  • 78 million gonorrhea and
  • 5.6 million, syphilis.

In total, 357 million new cases are caused annually by one of the most prevalent sexually transmitted pathogens. It is also estimated that there are more than 500 million people with genital herpes simplex virus (HSV), and more than 290 million women are infected with human papillomavirus (HPV). In some cases, these diseases can have serious negative consequences for reproductive health, such as infertility or mother-to-child transmission. Specifically, according to the WHO, in the last year, over 900,000 pregnant women were infected with syphilis, which due to mother-to-child transmission can result in 350,000 fetuses with different degrees of impairment, including stillbirths. Furthermore, resistance to antimicrobials is a threat to controlling these diseases worldwide. The causes of the growth of STDs are complex and rooted in social and cultural changes, among them the loss of fear of contracting a disease considered as fatal, such as HIV. “Its solution ranges from improving sex education and culture from early stages in the education of individuals to improving rapid detection systems to easy access to counseling and health care of the entire population without discrimination as to whether or not they belong to a

La entrada Rise in sexually transmitted diseases according to WHO last report aparece primero en Bioethics Observatory.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Uncategorized

Rise in sexually transmitted diseases according to WHO last report

Experts have warned in the 46th edition of the spanish journal EIDON of an upturn in sexually transmitted diseases, as a result of the social and cultural changes derailing the efforts and decline achieved after the “hardest” years of the HIV epidemic. According to the latest World Health Organization (WHO) report published in August 2016,

  • 131 million people contract chlamydia each year,
  • 78 million gonorrheas and
  • 5.6 million, syphilis.

In total, 357 million new cases are caused annually by one of the most prevalent sexually transmitted pathogens. It is also estimated that there are more than 500 million people with genital herpes simplex virus (HSV), and more than 290 million women are infected with human papillomavirus (HPV). In some cases, these diseases can have serious negative consequences for reproductive health, such as infertility or mother-to-child transmission. Specifically, according to the WHO, in the last year, over 900,000 pregnant women were infected with syphilis, which due to mother-to-child transmission can result in 350,000 fetuses with different degrees of impairment, including stillbirths. Furthermore, resistance to antimicrobials is a threat to controlling these diseases worldwide. The causes of the growth of STDs are complex and rooted in social and cultural changes, among them the loss of fear of contracting a disease considered as fatal, such as HIV“Its solution ranges from improving sex education and culture from early stages in the education of individuals, o improving rapid detection systems, to easy access to counselling and health care of the entire population without discrimination as to whether or not they belong to a healthcare system” (See HERE).

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.