Bioethics Blog Posts Tagged values

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Advance Care Planning and its Detractors

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Source: bioethics.net, a blog maintained by the editorial staff of The American Journal of Bioethics.

Excerpt:

The default mode of our technologically advanced medicine is to use our technology. Nowhere is this more true than close to the end of life. And our technology is really impressive; with it, we can keep chests going up and down and hearts beating for a long, long time.

The troubling thing is that there are many people who would rather not have lots of machines keeping their bodies going, thank you, maybe you could just give me some oxygen and pain medicine and let me die at home with my family? But they never get a chance to talk about it with their doctors, mostly due to doctors’ lack of time or comfort in addressing such questions. And, unlike every other procedure in medicine, doctors don’t need your permission to do one of the most invasive procedures of all to you: CPR. Of course, CPR is generally performed on someone who is indisposed and unable to give their informed consent to the procedure. And CPR is often the first step on the technological path of ventilators, tubes, dialysis, medications to support the blood pressure, machines that keep the heart pumping, and all of those wonderful interventions that are life-saving when used appropriately and death-prolonging when used indiscriminately. Treatments that treat . . . nothing.

Ideally, doctors take time to discuss patient preferences about such treatments with patients and their families before the occasion to intervene arises; however, the factors noted above make such discussions rare.

Read more at blogs.tiu.edu
The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors / blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Ethics & Society Newsfeed: February 17, 2017

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Source: Ethics & Society, blog of the Fordham University Center for Ethics Education.

Excerpt:

Image via 

Politics

Trump Ethics Monitor: Has The President Kept His Promises?
To track Trump’s ethics-related promises, NPR checked debate transcripts, campaign speeches and press conferences

Trump’s South Florida estate raises ethics questions
Ethics questions and possible conflicts surrounding President Donald Trump’s frequent trips to his sprawling Mar-a-Lago property, especially in regards to the invitation of Japanese Prime Minister, Shinzo Abe, over the weekend; a trip Trump pledged to pay for.

Should Jeff Sessions Recuse Himself From the Russia Inquiries?
Bruce Green, director of the Louis Stein Center for Law and Ethics at Fordham University, comments on whether Attorney General, Jeff Sessions should recuse himself from investigations involving former National Security Adviser, Michael Flynn and Russian hacking.

Trickle-Down Ethics at the Trump White House
Federal ethics guidelines forbid White House officials from using public position and power for their own private gain or to promote the private business interests of others. Trump Administration actions to be reviewed by the White House counsel and by the Office of Government Ethics.

Government Watchdog Presses Jason Chaffetz To Investigate Kellyanne Conway Himself
Jason Chaffetz (R-Utah), Chairman of the House Oversight Committee, requested that The Office of Government Ethics (OGE) investigate Kellyanne Conway’s possible breach of federal ethics rules, indicating that the Chairman may be trying to take pressure off his own committee, which has the most authority to investigate the matter.

Ethics Watchdog Denounces Conway’s Endorsement of Ivanka Trump Products
Federal government’s chief ethics watchdog calls for White House adviser, Kellyanne Conway, to be disciplined after publically endorsing Ivanka Trump’s product line.

Read more at ethicsandsociety.org
The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors / blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.