Tag: urban population

Bioethics News

A New Edition of Public Understanding of Science Is Now Available

Public Understand of Science (vol. 25, no. 5, 2016) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Public Opinions About Human Enhancement can Enhance the Expert-Only Debate: A Review Study” by Anne M. Dijkstra and Mirjam Schuijff
  • ‘Public Engagement with Scientific Evidence in Health: A Qualitative Study Among Primary-Care Patients in an Urban Population” by Marilyn M. Schapira, Diana Imbert, Eric Oh, Elena Byhoff, and Judy A. Shea

 

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

In the Journals – July 2015 Part II by Michelle Pentecost

 Here’s comes the second round of what you’ll find ‘In the Journals’ from July. For the Special Issue on HIV Criminalisation and Public Health in the latest edition of Critical Public Health, see this week’s earlier post.

To start us off, the latest issue of Medical Anthropology focuses on ‘exploring bodies in Southern and East Africa.’ In their editorial, Emilie Venables and Lenore Manderson introduce articles that ‘examine how an analytical lens of corporeality can offer new ways to examine and understand linkages and dissonances between migration, violence, and health in the lives of people across the Southern and Eastern African region’.

Images of Place: Visuals from Migrant Women Sex Workers in South Africa

Elsa Oliveira & Jo Vearey

 Many migrants in inner-city Johannesburg survive through unconventional and sometimes criminalized livelihood activities. In this article, we draw on data from a study that applied a participatory visual methodology to work with migrant women who sell sex, and explored the suitability of this approach as a way to engage with a presumed ‘hard to reach’ urban population. The lived experiences of migrant women sex workers were documented by combining participatory visual methods with a more traditional ethnographic approach, and this approach led us to new ways of seeing their worlds. This methodological approach raises important considerations for working with marginalized and criminalized urban groups.

“Once a Soldier, a Soldier Forever”: Exiled Zimbabwean Soldiers in South Africa

Godfrey Maringira & Lorena Núñez Carrasco

 Through military training, soldiers’ bodies are shaped and prepared for war and military-related duties.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

Urbanisation Up Close

Image credit: joiseyshowaa, Flickr

Jocalyn Clark @jocalynclark discusses the urbanisation of the world’s population and its impact on global health. Undeniably the world is urbanising. By 2050, according to the UN, the world’s urban population will almost double from its 2007 size of 3.3 billion … Continue reading »

The post Urbanisation Up Close appeared first on Speaking of Medicine.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

(en)Gendering psychiatric disease: what does sex/gender have to do with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)?

Mallory Bowers is a 5th year Neuroscience doctoral candidate working with Dr. Kerry Ressler at Emory University. Prior to graduate school, Mallory received her Bachelor of Arts from the University of Pennsylvania. Mallory is interested in behavioral neuroscience, with a particular focus on how neural plasticity contributes to learning. With Dr. Ressler, Mallory is using a mouse model of exposure-based psychotherapy to better understand the neurobiology of learned fear. Specifically, her research focuses on a potential interaction between the cholecystokinin and endogenous cannabinoid systems that may underlie extinction of cued fear. Mallory was on the organizing committee for the 2013 “Bias in the Academy” Conference and is President of Emory Women in Neuroscience (E-WIN).

As I’ve become more entrenched in the PTSD field, I’ve been struck by the prominent sex/gender difference in the prevalence of PTSD (among many other psychiatric disorders) and the categorical use of male animal models. As researchers begin to explore sex differences in animal models of stress, anxiety, and fear, evidence suggests that male animals are more vulnerable to acute and chronic stress, while females appear to be more resilient (Cohen and Yehuda 2011). The results of these animal studies contradict the human epidemiological data, with lifetime prevalence of PTSD at 10-14% in women and 5-6% in men in the United States (Breslau, Davis, et al. 1991, Breslau, Davis, et al. 1997, Kessler, Sonnega, et al. 1995, Resnick, Kilpatrick, et al. 1993). In this post, I’d like to explore the ways in which socio-cultural conditioning genders an individual’s sense of self, influences definitions and language surrounding mental health, and supports frameworks of gender bias (a putative low-grade, chronic stressor) – potentially contributing to sex/gender differences observed in the prevalence of certain psychiatric disorders, specifically PTSD.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.