Bioethics Blog Posts Tagged rights

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“Docs v. Glocks”: Gag rule lifted

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Source: bioethics.net, a blog maintained by the editorial staff of The American Journal of Bioethics.

Excerpt:

The American Academy of Pediatrics, the AMA, and the American Academy of Family Physicians all encourage their members to ask parents about firearms, in the same spirit as they ask about automobile restraints, swimming pools, and other factors that relate to the health of their patients.  If parents report that there are firearms in the home, the pediatricians advise them on gun safety.  Among homes with children and firearms, more than 40% have at least one unlocked firearm.  A trial in 2008 showed encouraging results when pediatricians counseled parents on strategies for safe gun storage and handed out cable locks, reporting a 21.4% increase in families who stored their firearms locked.

In 2011 the State of Florida passed a law (Firearm Owners’ Privacy Act, or FOPA) that forbade doctors from asking patients whether there were firearms in the home.   The law carried some harsh penalties, including a $10,000 fine and loss of medical license.  FOPA was overturned by the Florida Supreme Court on free speech grounds, but was reinstated by a three judge panel of the 11th Circuit.    Florida managed to convince the panel that: 1) this was not impingement of free speech, but merely a regulation of professional activity; 2) the law was necessary to protect the Second Amendment rights of parents.  A number of physicians and organizations appealed, and on February 17, 2017, a full panel of the 11th Circuit once again overturned most of the elements of FOPA.

Read more at denasusandavis.wordpress.com
The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors / blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Part I: LOVING and Bioethics The Right to Marry

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Source: bioethics.net, a blog maintained by the editorial staff of The American Journal of Bioethics.

Excerpt:

[embedded content]LOVING – Official Trailer from Mill Valley Film Festival on Vimeo.

Courtesy Focus Films
LOVING was the closing night film of the 39th Mill Valley Film Festival. Jeff Nichols is its writer/director. At 38 years old, born in Little Rock, Arkansas, Nichols is a master at breaking stereotypes about cultures, especially those below the Mason Dixon Line.  

LOVING is based on the lives of Mildred  and Richard Loving. The portrayals by Ruth Negga and Joel Edgerton in the title roles is an exquisitely intimate, internal portrait. The main characters met young, fell in love in a poor rural neighbor of Virginia where races interacted socially. The love aspect of the story is prominent but the underclass nature of interracial life in the region is equally as strong. In 1958, the couple were forbidden to marry because their state was among many with anti-miscegenation laws.  

Nichols’ LOVING is as much about class— working poor—as it is about race. As long as Mildred and Richard kept within the constraints of the geo-social ‘Bottoms’ the state powers would not care. They weren’t so much jailed because Mildred was Black while Richard White but because they dared want their love and children legitimated. Anti-miscegenation laws stemmed, above all else not from morality but economics—controlling who could own property, historically determined by parentage. The law they violated was a vestige of slavery in their state.

LOVING, the feature length fictional film, evolved from director Nichols’ admiration for a documentary made years before.
Read more at www.bioethicsscreenreflections.com
The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors / blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.