Tag: research personnel

Bioethics Blogs

Find the Things No One Else Wants to Do, Do Them, and Do Them Well: An Interview with Jamie Gothro

by Maeve Luthin, JD, Professional Development Manager


Welcome to another installment of our featured member interviews where we introduce you to our members—individuals who work to advance ethical research on a daily basis. Over the course of the next few months we will be shining a spotlight on members of the Certified IRB Professional (CIP®) and Certified Professional IACUC Administrator (CPIA®) Councils. Please read on to learn more about their professional experiences and what goes on behind-the-scenes in their lives!

Today we’d like to introduce you to Jamie Gothro, animal welfare officer and IACUC administrator at the VA San Diego Healthcare System. 

Maeve Luthin (ML): When and why did you join the field? 
Jamie Gothro (JG): I morphed into the world of IACUC as a natural extension of some of my veterinary technology and animal resource duties. I started out being responsible for setting up a training program for animal research personnel, and that led to looking at the qualifications of protocol participants. From there, I started getting more interested and involved in IACUC processes. I especially like the opportunity to see the research studies in their early stages during protocol review, and I enjoy post-approval monitoring, too. I get a chance to see the work in action!

ML: What prompted your interest in joining the CPIA Council, and why did you agree to serve?
JG: The CPIA Council focuses on improving the quality of the administrative staff of the IACUC. There are programs that help promote and advance most of the other careers in the laboratory animal field, but the world of regulations is complex and requires a lot of time and dedication by IACUC staff to keep their institutions on the right side of the laws.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

Paper Preview: Implementation of a Consent for Chart Review and Contact

Guest post by 
Our article “Implementation of a Consent for Chart Review and Contact and its Impact in one Clinical Centre” focuses on issues regarding patient health information privacy and recruitment for medical research studies.  Research studies are an integral part of the advancement of medical therapies; however, recruitment into research studies can be challenging.  In Canada, the use of health information is governed by Personal Health Information Protection Act and at our institution a policy is in place that allows only those health professionals directly in the circle of care access to patient information to further protect patient’s privacy.  This policy could have a potential negative effect on recruitment rates into research studies.  Physicians and other clinical personnel often do not have the time to discuss ongoing research projects with patients as time is spent focusing on the patient’s medical issues.  In addition, there is concern that if  physicians use the information that they gather in a clinical encounter to recruit for research studies, it is equivalent to that physician sharing medical information  with someone who does not have a right to it.
In light of these challenges, the Division of Metabolism and Endocrinology at the University of Ottawa implemented a consent for chart review and contact (CCRC).  The CCRC is a document presented to a patient on their first meeting a new physician.  The CCRC gives permission for the patient’s medical file to be reviewed by research personnel to determine whether a patient is eligible for a research study.  If the patient meets the study criteria, the CCRC also grants permission for the patient to be contacted by research personnel to be provided with the details of the research study so they can decide if they wish to participate.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.