Tag: plastic surgery

Bioethics News

Medical Tourism Booms

Medical Tourism Booms

March 14, 2017

(Deutsche Welle) – Medical tourism has grown into a healthy travel sector as people shop beyond their borders for everything from dental work to plastic surgery. Thanks to the internet, a growing middle class, often from countries without high-quality healthcare, “know that there are treatments out there for them,” said Julie Munro, president of the Medical Travel Quality Alliance, which produces a ranking of the 10 best hospitals for medical tourists.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics News

In Plastic Surgery, Brazil Gets The Silver Medal

August 17, 2016

(Forbes) Beginning with the opening ceremonies, you’ll probably see some of Brazil’s most “beautiful people” through the course of the Summer Olympic Games in Rio. You may be thinking that you’d like to have that butt, that nose or those breasts. Well, maybe in some cases you can, because not everything in Rio may be “real.” After all, Brazil is second to only one country in the plastic surgery Olympics.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics News

When the Olympics Happen in the Land of Nip and Tuck

August 12, 2016

(Yahoo! News) – Brazil currently follows the United States as the second most-popular hot spot for cosmetic surgery and is a top booked destination for “plastic surgery medical tourism” this year — a term used to describe travel outside of a home country to undergo medical procedures. Why schlep for surgery? People are primarily drawn to the lower price tag. The Brazilian Butt Lift, a popular procedure that liposuctions fat from one area of your body to then augment your bum, costs about $14,000 at a private clinic in the U.S., as compared with $4,000 in Brazil, according to Medigo, a Berlin-based medical tourism agency.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics News

The Dangers of Plastic Surgery Tourism

July 14, 2016

(TIME) – About 750,000 Americans travel abroad to receive medical care and plastic surgery every year, usually in hopes of cheaper rates. But a new report from U.S. health officials reveals that some Americans have contracted severe infections from getting plastic surgery—including breast augmentations, liposuction and buttock lifts, among other procedures—in foreign countries, highlighting the possible risks of medical tourism.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

Graphic Medicine and Medical Anthropology by Dana Walrath

Introduction

When I began my graphic memoir series, Aliceheimers, it focused just on life with my mother Alice before and during dementia. But the revelatory insight that she has retained, even during the late stages of this sickness, has led me to sometimes let the character “Alice” metamorphose into an odd sort of sage. Here, she and I explore the relationship between Medical Anthropology and Graphic Medicine. Alice’s deeply held beliefs from life before dementia combine with her mind opened by dementia, allowing me to imagine a quasi-academic conversation that we never could have had in real life.

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A writer, artist and anthropologist, Dana Walrath likes to cross borders and disciplines with her work. After years of using stories to teach medical students at University of Vermont’s College of Medicine, she turned to writing her own. Her award winning verse novel, Like Water on Stone, was completed during the year she spent as a Fulbright Scholar in Armenia. Her recently released graphic memoir Aliceheimer’s has brought her throughout North America and Eurasia to speak about the role of comics in healing including talks at TEDx Battenkill and TEDx Yerevan. Her recent essays have appeared in Slate and Foreign Policy. You can visit her at danawalrath.com.

 

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  • Panel 1 of 3.
    • Title: “Graphic Medicine and Medical Anthropology: An exogamous marriage or paraphyletic groups?”
    • Image: Two kinds of family trees: comics (Mickey Mouse ears) and medicine (medical text) combine to form graphic medicine; biological and cultural anthropology (represented by book spines with names of some anthropological sages like Boas, Kroeber, Mead Leakey, Levi-Strauss) combine to form “Medical Anthropology”.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

Special Issues! Biomedicalization in Brazil; Life after Biopolitics by Anna Zogas

April brings many special issues! We’ve already highlighted themed issues on insurance and digitized health, and here are two more themed issues to know about: this month’s História, Ciências, Saúde-Manguinhos is on The Biomedicalization of Brazilian Bodies: Anthropological Perspectives, and the current South Atlantic Quarterly is about Life After Biopolitics. Enjoy!

História, Ciências, Saúde-Manguinhos

The Biomedicalization of Brazilian Bodies: Anthropological Perspectives (open access)
Ilana Löwy, Emilia Sanabria

This special issue brings together work on the “biomedicalization” of Brazilian bodies, examining the way biomedical techniques are taken up across the divergent structural constraints afforded by private and public health in Brazil. Biomedicalization – or “technoscientific interventions in biomedical diagnostics, treatments, practices, and health to exert more and faster transformations of bodies, selves, and lives” – forms an assemblage that is both global and highly local. Our aim is to interrogate this phenomenon from Brazil.

The authors, writing from Brazil, Europe, and North America, share a long-standing commitment to analyzing the specific local biologies – and local politics – of Brazilian approaches to health and the body. They probe the incursion of biomedical technologies within richly depicted social worlds, revealing quotidian violence (particularly where women’s bodies are concerned), exceptional forms of care within conditions of precarity, and the intersections of kinship, class, work, and the symbolic capital afforded by biomedical consumption in Brazil. They share a commitment to critically engaging with biomedical conceptions of disease and illness, destabilizing the body as a stable referent (implicitly grounded in a biomedical ontology), analyzing health as a deeply relational, situated, and political process.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

In the Journals — March 2016, Part I by Anna Zogas

Here is the first installment of articles published in March. There is a special issue of East Asian Science, Technology and Society on “Body and Enhancement Technology,” and I also want to note that there are reviews of several recently published books about disability collected in this month’s Sociology of Health & Illness.

BioSocieties

DSM over time: From legitimisation of authority to hegemony
Katia Romelli, Alessandra Frigerio and Monica Colombo

The proposed revision of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), published by the American Psychiatric Association (APA), has reignited a protracted debate in psychiatry and clinical psychology regarding the criteria used to diagnose and classify mental disorders. Drawing on the concepts of legitimisation and hegemony, the aim of this study is to deconstruct how the authoritativeness of the DSM was discursively constructed, legitimised and consolidated over time. To fulfil this purpose, we combine a critical psychology perspective with critical discourse analysis and adopt a multi-level model of analysis that embraces the notions of genre and repertoire in scientific discourse. The materials were approached considering the following interrelated dimensions: (a) semantic macro-areas; (b) discursive strategies; and (c) linguistic means. The data set is constituted by the Forewords and Introductions of different editions of the DSM, from the DSM-I through to the DSM-5. The analysis highlights the discursive strategies that play an important role in self-legitimisation and the construction of a dominant hegemonic discourse.

Ferreting things out: Biosecurity, pandemic flu and the transformation of experimental systems
Natalie Hannah Porter

At the end of 2011, microbiologists created a scientific and media frenzy by genetically engineering mutant avian flu viruses that transmitted through the air between ferrets, the animal most widely used to model human flu.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

In the Journals — February 2016, Part II by Aaron Seaman

And now for a very belated February post (not even the extra day could help this year…). However, there is much to dig in to here, including two special issues, “The Sociology of Health Care Safety and Quality” in Sociology of Health & Illness and “Anthropology and Medical Photography: Ethnographic, Critical and Comparative Perspectives” in Visual Anthropology. Enjoy!

Social Science & Medicine

Invisible walls within multidisciplinary teams: Disciplinary boundaries and their effects on integrated care

Elisa Giulia Liberati, Mara Gorli, Giuseppe Scaratti

Delivery of interdisciplinary integrated care is central to contemporary health policy. Hospitals worldwide are therefore attempting to move away from a functional organisation of care, built around discipline-based specialisation, towards an approach of delivering care through multidisciplinary teams. However, the mere existence of such teams may not guarantee integrated and collaborative work across medical disciplines, which can be hindered by boundaries between and within professions. This paper analyses the boundaries that affect collaboration and care integration in newly created multidisciplinary teams. Empirical data are drawn from an ethnographic research conducted in the sub-intensive stroke unit of an Italian public hospital. Data collection involved 180 h of observations and conversations with 42 healthcare providers. Findings show that disciplinary boundaries hinder both intra-professional and inter-professional collaboration. Doctors from different disciplines adopt different, and sometimes conflicting, clinical approaches, doctors and nurses construct discipline-specific professional identities, and conflicts emerge between doctors and nurses from different disciplines over the regulation of the medical–nursing boundary. Achieving collaboration and integration between professionals from different disciplines may be particularly challenging when the group with less institutional power (nurses, in this case) has developed a high level of expertise on the needs of the patients targeted by the team.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics News

Medical Fees for Foreign Patients to Be Disclosed

March 4, 2016

(The Korea Times) – Fifty medical centers have disclosed their fees to prevent illegal brokerage activities and provide credible service information, as a growing number of foreign patients seek treatment here. The move is the first of its kind, in line with the central government’s efforts to push plastic surgery clinics to disclose their fees for price comparisons.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

A global perspective on beauty

Back in June, I wrote about the Beauty Demands seminar we hosted here at the Nuffield Council that looked at the role played by health professionals in both creating and meeting the increasing demand for invasive cosmetic procedures. In the next seminar of the series, held in Birmingham (also see Kate Harvey’s previous blog), we turned our attention to the globalisation of beauty, debunking the myth that the rising interest in surgical ‘fixes’ is a trend emerging only in the wealthy western world. In exploring the very different ways in which the demands of beauty play out in diverse societies around the world, some common and thought-provoking themes emerged.

Almost all speakers strongly challenged the idea that the growing use of surgery (and/or invasive non-surgical techniques such as fillers and botox) as a means to achieve beauty ideals is simply an example of ‘westernisation’ or ‘Americanisation’. Of course the US is a major source of cultural exports – of media, fashion, and celebrity culture to name but a few – but these influences exist alongside, and often in relationship to, local cultural and beauty norms (which are not, necessarily, either more or less benign than the imported variety). In Japan, we were told, there are competing beauty ideals of ‘American’ larger breasts and ‘Japanese’ smaller ones, while in Brazil, breast reductions in response to the traditional preference for smaller breasts are one of the most common surgeries performed, despite the parallel popularity of implants. The US, moreover, is far from the only exporter of culture, technology or aesthetics: South Korea and Brazil were cited as examples of countries with their own pop and celebrity cultures whose influence extend well beyond their national borders.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.