Tag: organizations

Bioethics Blogs

More than Local Arrangements: How Conference Logistics Can Speak to Values by Sarah Pickman

In the fall of 2016, my colleagues Tess Lanzarotta, Marco Ramos, and I met as the core organizers for the “Critical Histories, Activist Futures” conference to hammer out our individual roles. We decided that I would take on the role of head of local arrangements, managing all of the practical logistics for the conference: food, room reservations, registration, etc. “Local arrangements” is, at first glance, a series of crucial but unsexy grunt work tasks. Perhaps, at this very moment, images from your own past of stacking folding chairs and wrestling with projector cords are beginning to swirl in your head at the mention of this phrase. Before you roll your eyes and click away, let me try to convince you that local arrangements can be a productive space to think about what an academic conference looks like and who it is for, as well as to grapple with the limits of the conference as a model for academic discourse.

I embraced the role initially because I do feel strongly that in order for an event to achieve its objectives, the mundane aspects must be taken care of and must run as seamlessly as possible. Prior experience organizing events has taught me that no matter how interesting and well-presented a symposium or lecture’s content is, if there is not enough food served afterwards or the room is very cold that’s all anyone will talk about. This is to say nothing of my own personal experience as a graduate student, scooping up free sandwiches at events and watching my professors race each other to the coffee dispenser during break times.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics News

New State Network against surrogate motherhood in Spain

Alicia Miyares is a feminist philosopher and writer. For a couple of years now, she has been involved in the movement “No somos Vasijas” (We are not vessels), together with other philosophers such as Amelia Valcárcel and Victoria Camps, dedicating a large part of her time fighting against surrogacy. Use a Surrogate mother to have a child is currently banned in Spain, although its possible regulation has entered fully into the political debate. Miyares spares no criticism for what she understands as no more than a euphemism under which hides a business that is degrading for women, by reducing them to mere reproductive machines. In the last week of April, Miyares and 50 women’s organizations and LGTBI groups presented the Red Estatal contra el Alquiler de Vientres (State Network against Surrogacy) at a press conference in Madrid. The surrogation site makes his position clear: “We are not incubators, nor vessels, nor uteruses nor wombs for rent: we are women, human lives with which some people are trying to set up a new business that will benefit the strongest and suppress the weakest” (See HERE the site)

La entrada New State Network against surrogate motherhood in Spain aparece primero en Bioethics Observatory.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

Pray Tell, What Does Harvey have to do with Abortion?

Nothing brings out the true color of people as clearly as a national catastrophe such as hurricane Harvey. “Beautiful” has been the color of the vast majority of people who have been victims of, or responders to, one of the worst natural disasters in U.S. history. Many people who watched their houses and possessions float away, who must have wondered how they will ever recover from their losses, nevertheless are painting the beautiful colors of faith, trust, courage, and patience. Many people who have put their own jobs and lives on hold to go down to Houston to help strangers in need, to pluck them out of the flood waters, to feed and shelter them, and to give them the proverbial shirt off their backs, are painting the beautiful colors of love, service, and sacrifice toward fellow human beings in need. Yes, Harvey has brought out many beautiful colors, as the vast majority of people have displayed the best of what human beings are capable of.

However, tragedies also bring out the true “ugly” colors of other people. Looters have broken into business and private dwellings and have wantonly stolen what did not belong to them. On some occasions, first responders have been robbed and even shot at. And when the flood waters recede and flood victims begin to rebuild their homes and lives, be assured that scammers will make the rounds, taking advantage of people in great need to pad their own greedy pockets with ill-gotten gain. Yes, Harvey has brought out many ugly colors, as a few people have displayed the worst of what human beings are capable of.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

Webinar Follow-up: Data and Safety Monitoring: Advanced Issues and Case Studies

In July, PRIM&R collaborated with CITI Program to host the advanced-level webinar Data and Safety Monitoring: Advanced Issues and Case Studies. Expanding on introductory knowledge in the module Data and Safety Monitoring in Human Subjects Research, part of CITI Program’s Biomedical Basic course, this webinar described ways in which the IRB, the data and safety monitoring board (DSMB), the investigator, and the sponsor can work together to ensure scientific integrity and subject safety in clinical trials. Summaries of government and non-government organizations’ guidance as well as interactive case studies offered strategies for handling complex situations that may arise during data and safety monitoring, including when and how to report adverse and unanticipated events, when a DSMB is needed, and what is considered a conflict of interest.

The post Webinar Follow-up: Data and Safety Monitoring: Advanced Issues and Case Studies appeared first on Ampersand.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

Lessons from the West African Ebola epidemic

Conventional wisdom—and an article in the Journal of Medical Ethics reviewed on this blog two years ago—advise that health research should not be conducted during times of crisis. Yes, such conditions compromise the controlled environments that studies typically require to produce reliable results, but they can also threaten the ethical integrity of research. Without institutional mechanisms to hold them accountable, investigators may cut corners, violate standards of privacy and informed consent, and even endanger participants. Disruption in the normal function of medical services can also apply pressure on individuals unable to access care by traditional means to seek it out by participating in risky research. And even if one assumes that researchers display honesty beyond reproach, it is still unreasonable to expect that they would be able to keep their cool in the midst of widespread panic and social collapse. But there is a fly in the ointment, at least when it comes to crises caused by epidemics. Public health organizations are first-responders at these moments, but they would be dead in the water without relevant data collected under real-world conditions to guide their actions. In this situation, the precautionary principle alone is not enough to stop a study altogether. In fact, it could be argued that an absolute prohibition against biomedical research in such situations may itself be unethical. The question then becomes, not whether, but how to guarantee ethical research during outbreaks?

The Ethics Review Board (ERB) of Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) had to contend with this question during the 2014 Ebola epidemic. They recently chronicled their experience in the April issue of Public Health Ethics.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

Does Female Genital Mutilation Have Health Benefits? The Problem with Medicalizing Morality

By Brian D. Earp (@briandavidearp)

Please note: this piece was originally published in Quillette Magazine.

 

Four members of the Dawoodi Bohra sect of Islam living in Detroit, Michigan have recently been indicted on charges of female genital mutilation (FGM). This is the first time the US government has prosecuted an “FGM” case since a federal law was passed in 1996. The world is watching to see how the case turns out.

A lot is at stake here. Multiculturalism, religious freedom, the limits of tolerance; the scope of children’s—and minority group—rights; the credibility of scientific research; even the very concept of “harm.”

To see how these pieces fit together, I need to describe the alleged crime.

* * *

The term “FGM” is likely to bring to mind the most severe forms of female genital cutting, such as clitoridectomy or infibulation (partial sewing up of the vaginal opening). But the World Health Organization (WHO) actually recognizes four main categories of FGM, covering dozens of different procedures.

One of the more “minor” forms is called a “ritual nick.” This practice, which I have argued elsewhere should not be performed on children, involves pricking the foreskin or “hood” of the clitoris to release a drop of blood.

Healthy tissue is not typically removed by this procedure, which is often done by trained clinicians in the communities where it is common. Long-term adverse health consequences are believed to be rare.

Here is why this matters. Initial, albeit conflicting reports suggest that the Dawoodi Bohra engage in this, or a similar, more limited form of female genital cutting – not the more extreme forms that are often highlighted in the Western media.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

Does Female Genital Mutilation Have Health Benefits? The Problem with Medicalizing Morality

Does Female Genital Mutilation Have Health Benefits? The Problem with Medicalizing Morality

By Brian D. Earp (@briandavidearp)

Please note: this piece was originally published in Quillette Magazine.

 

Four members of the Dawoodi Bohra sect of Islam living in Detroit, Michigan have recently been indicted on charges of female genital mutilation (FGM). This is the first time the US government has prosecuted an “FGM” case since a federal law was passed in 1996. The world is watching to see how the case turns out.

A lot is at stake here. Multiculturalism, religious freedom, the limits of tolerance; the scope of children’s—and minority group—rights; the credibility of scientific research; even the very concept of “harm.”

To see how these pieces fit together, I need to describe the alleged crime.

* * *

The term “FGM” is likely to bring to mind the most severe forms of female genital cutting, such as clitoridectomy or infibulation (partial sewing up of the vaginal opening). But the World Health Organization (WHO) actually recognizes four main categories of FGM, covering dozens of different procedures.

One of the more “minor” forms is called a “ritual nick.” This practice, which I have argued elsewhere should not be performed on children, involves pricking the foreskin or “hood” of the clitoris to release a drop of blood.

Healthy tissue is not typically removed by this procedure, which is often done by trained clinicians in the communities where it is common. Long-term adverse health consequences are believed to be rare.

Here is why this matters. Initial, albeit conflicting reports suggest that the Dawoodi Bohra engage in this, or a similar, more limited form of female genital cutting – not the more extreme forms that are often highlighted in the Western media.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics News

Call for Papers: Health and Food Ethics

August 14, 2017

October 2018

Health and Food Ethics

Hippocrates once said, “Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food.” Physicians in some U.S. cities have followed this advice by writing prescriptions for patients to obtain fresh produce through healthy food outreach programs. Clinical encounters, however, cannot fully reverse the negative health effects of low quality diets. Further, millions remain hungry as the quantity of the global food supply is at risk. Providing safe, nutritious, and environmentally- sustainable food to all is a great challenge, and if the global community cannot find solutions to feed the world, economic and social costs will be high. “Ending hunger, achieving food security, improving nutrition, and promoting sustainable agriculture” is one of the Sustainable Development Goals set forth by the United Nations. As such, a central question worth exploring in the October 2018 issue of the AMA Journal of Ethics is: What should be the roles of health professionals in promoting accountability by governments, non-governmental and civil society organizations, and the food and beverage industry in promoting strategies that can meet the nutrition and health needs of our global population? Other issues include: reducing and redistributing food loss and waste; incentivizing responsible food production and labeling practices; communicating about food practices and food access during clinical encounters; and strategies to promote food security as a goal of health professions.

Manuscripts submitted for peer review consideration and inclusion in this issue must follow all Instructions for Authors and be submitted by 12 February 2018.

Link for more information


Image: By Original: lyzadangerDerivative work: Diliff – http://www.flickr.com/photos/lyza/49545547,

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics News

Your Zip Code Might Be As Important To Health As Your Genetic Code

When a receptionist hands out a form to fill out at a doctor’s office, the questions are usually about medical issues: What’s the visit for? Are you allergic to anything? Up to date on vaccines? But some health organizations are now asking much more general questions: Do you have trouble paying your bills? Do you feel safe at home? Do you have enough to eat?

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

Whatever Happened to Long-Term Care Reform?

From the Trenches: A Prescription for Change

I have enjoyed looking at the pictures of protestors being arrested in our nation’s capital. I concur with many commentators who credit the civil disobedience of the protestors – many of whom are members of the disability rights activist group ADAPT – with the defeat of the Senate bill to abolish the Affordable Care Act. It’s also been fun because I know so many people in the photos.

The Affordable Care Act was a massive piece of legislation. The complexities and moving parts are best understood by people who have very closely followed or implemented the law. I generally think of the ACA as three things:

1. Reform of the private insurance market with the goal of providing greater access to insurance coverage;

2. Changes to Medicare, such as closing the prescription drug donut hole; and

3. Changes to Medicaid. 

Mike Oxford, Executive Director for Policy at the Topeka Independent Living Resource Center and a member of the national chapter of ADAPT, was one of many who protested against the Senate bill to repeal the Affordable Care Act.

Community Services Optional?

The Medicaid issue that has drawn the most attention is the matter of expanding access, appropriately called “Medicaid expansion.” But the law contains other Medicaid provisions as well. It provides incentives for states to continue to “re-balance” their systems of providing long-term care. “Re-balance” is often mentioned in quotation marks because states were never in balance. Nonetheless, through the ACA, states were provided additional federal matching funds if they would transfer more long-term care to community services and away from institutions, such as nursing homes.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.