Tag: nursing students

Bioethics Blogs

Harvey and Irma: Bioethics in Natural Disasters

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

This is a time of disaster. Last week Hurricane Harvey devastated Southeast Texas, a place where I did my doctoral studies. This week we are awaiting Hurricane Irma, the strongest hurricane to head toward South Florida in 25 years. My family lays in the path of that coming storm. I first became interested in natural disaster in 1989 when my college campus was jolted by a 7.1 earthquake in Northern California.

Bioethics has a role in responding to and preparing for these natural disasters. Most every state, large city and county, and most hospitals have been working on crisis standards of care plans. In 2009 and again in 2012, the Institute of Medicine recommended governments to undertake such planning. Many of us working in bioethics have been involved in these efforts. More specifically, we have been involved with developing ethical frameworks for decision-making, policy-making, and operations during emergency planning.

I worked with Texas during its planning for pandemic flu and for the last 3 years have been part of the ethics subcommittee of Illinois’ workgroup, most recently as chair. Similar groups have produced excellent reports in many places such as Delaware, North Carolina, Michigan, Minnesota, Tennessee, Texas and Toronto. They offer guidance and justification for a varied set of guiding principles and ethical frameworks. All of them hold certain core ideals in common.

First, all of the reports agree that transparency and open communication is essential. Planning needs to involve not only government officials, but also community members.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

Bending the Odds: Pedagogy and Dialogue in Large Lecture Courses by Sandra Hyde

As academics in large public research universities, I am always amazed that when we speak of an ideal pedagogy, we speak about our small intimate seminars where we have the time and resources to experiment with 25 students or less. In my 13 years of teaching, I look forward to those settings when I get to teach one small undergraduate seminar a year. Over the years, I have also tried to make my large lecture hall shrink by trying to utilize different techniques to foster student based learning and most important, to create more interactive group problem solving and reduce the teacher as lord model of education. While this often works in small seminars, those wonderful nuggets of intimate interactive learning, I find it a challenge to accomplish this when I am in large lecture halls (over 200 students) with limited to graduate student teaching support.

In a large Introduction to Medical Anthropology course (what is called Anthropology 227 at McGill), I have worked over the years to integrate more student-interactive learning. I often compare teaching this course to managing a large ocean-liner with staff of different standing and students who are extremely eclectic as they are drawn from across campus from multiple faculties. For example, students in engineering and medicine will take the course as their one social science requirement and for others they find introduction to medical anthropology intriguing. Students in the humanities are also looking to take their one social science course. There are also medical practitioners and their allied health colleagues often nursing students returning to university to complete their BS.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics News

Student Testimonials Manhattan Summer School Program, July 11 – 22, 2016

In just the first week of the course, I’ve been exposed to world-class thought leaders speaking on critically emerging ethical issues of global impact in ways that transform hypothetical case studies to real-world dilemmas. Nowhere else could I have had the opportunity to engage in provocative dialogue with the Board President of Doctors Without Borders about the horrific ethical challenges and dilemmas the organization faces in war zones. A truly profound experience for a long-time nursing professor and biomedical researcher who has taught bioethics for many years. Nancy King Reame, MSN, PhD, FAAN, Director, Pilot Studies Resource of the Irving Institute for Clinical & Translational Research, Mary Dickey Lindsay Professor of Nursing (Emerita), Columbia University Medical Center

GBI summer school definitely exceeded my expectations. The guided tour to the United Nations Headquarters offered us an exciting opportunity to get a behind-the-scenes view of the UN at work. We visited the newly renovated General Assembly Hall, the Security Council Chamber, the Trusteeship Council Chamber, and the Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) Chamber in the renovated Conference Building. We also learned about how the United Nations addresses issues such as human rights, disarmament, peace and security, and the Sustainable Development Goals, closely related to GBI’s mission. I found the field trip to be fantastic, and the summer program overall was extremely interesting and informative. All lecturers were extremely respected within their fields. My favorite lectures were those of Dr. Jonathan Garlick and Dr. Bruce Gelb. Dr. Garlick spoke about stem cells, CRISPR, and the possibility of same-sex couples being able to have biological children as a result of stem cell research, while Dr.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics News

Summer program participants’ testimonials, Manhattan, July 11-22, 2016

GBI summer school definitely exceeded my expectations. The guided tour to the United Nations Headquarters offered us an exciting opportunity to get a behind-the-scenes view of the UN at work. We visited the newly renovated General Assembly Hall, the Security Council Chamber, the Trusteeship Council Chamber, and the Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) Chamber in the renovated Conference Building. We also learned about how the United Nations addresses issues such as human rights, disarmament, peace and security, and the Sustainable Development Goals, closely related to GBI’s mission. I found the field trip to be fantastic, and the summer program overall was extremely interesting and informative. All lecturers were extremely respected within their fields. My favorite lectures were those of Dr. Jonathan Garlick and Dr. Bruce Gelb. Dr. Garlick spoke about stem cells, CRISPR, and the possibility of same-sex couples being able to have biological children as a result of stem cell research, while Dr. Gelb spoke about the ethics of transplantation and organ trafficking. Dr. Gelb’s in-depth lecture about his contribution to a full-face transplant performed for the first time in the world at NYU Langone Medical Center was extremely interesting. Although these have been my favorites, there was not a single boring or non-engaging lecture. It was a truly interdisciplinary endeavor and my fellow participants were very cosmopolitan. I would recommend this summer program with no hesitation. Aidan Appleby, B.A. Psychology Candidate, University of Miami Coral Gables, USA

I teach undergraduate nursing students, students in the RN/BSN program track, and students who take my freshman seminar style course (Geography of Experience), and I am excited to incorporate the information I have learned in this summer program into my classes.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

Honoring Choices Minnesota Conference

Come to Honoring Choices Minnesota “Sharing the Experience 2016” on Thursday, July 21, 2016.








Speakers include

Rahul Koranne, MD, MBA, FACP
Chief Medical Officer
Minnesota Hospital Association  
“ACP across Minnesota – A call to collective action!”

Deborah Day Laxson
Author, Entrepreneur, ACP Advocate
“Life Support: When Is Enough, Enough? A Real Life Story of Honoring Choices”

Breakouts include

  • The overlooked role of agent
  • ACP and dementia
  • Rules and regulations: meeting the standards
  • ACP with LGBT clients
  • POLST changes and updates

Additional topics and updates include

  • ACP in Academic Health Settings: Medical Students and Nursing Students
  • The second-annual Community Champion Volunteer Award
  • Updates on Honoring Choices development across the state and throughout the nation
  • Legislative and National news and updates, including reimbursement information

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics News

A New Edition of Nursing Ethics Is Now Available

May 11, 2016

Nursing Ethics (vol. 23, no. 2, 2016) is available online by subscription only.

Articles include:

  • “Effectiveness of Narrative Pedagogy in Developing Student Nurses’ Advocacy Role” by Priscilla K. Gazarian, Lauren M. Fernberg, and Kelly D. Sheehan
  • “Nothing to Complain About? Residents’ and Relatives’ Views on a ‘Good Life’ and Ethical Challenges in Nursing Homes” by Georg Bollig, Eva Gjengedal, and Jan Henrik Rosland
  • “An Innovative Approach to Teaching Bioethics in Management of Healthcare” by Silviya Aleksandrova-Yankulovska
  • “It’s Agony for Us as Well: Neonatal Nurses Reflect on Iatrogenic Pain” by Janet Green, et al.
  • “Non-Therapeutic Intensive Care for Organ Donation: A Healthcare Professionals’ Opinion Survey” by Stephanie Camut, et al.
  • “Comparison of Professional Values between Nursing Students in Taiwan and China” by Yu-Hua Lin, et al.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

States of Grace: From Doctor to Patient and Back Again

Katie Grogan, DMH, MA and Tamara Prevatt, MA,
Master Scholars Program in Humanistic Medicine, NYU School of Medicine

Dr. Grace Dammann at States of Grace film screening and talkback, NYULMC

Before the accident, Dr. Grace Dammann was a caregiver through and through, in every aspect of her life.
A pioneering AIDS specialist, she co-founded one of the first HIV/AIDS clinics for socioeconomically disadvantaged patients in San Francisco at Laguna Honda Hospital. She was honored by the Dalai Lama with an Unsung Heroes of Compassion Award for her service and devotion to this population. Grace was also the primary breadwinner and parent in her family with partner Nancy “Fu” Schroeder and adopted daughter Sabrina, who was born with cerebral palsy and HIV. She lived and worked in such close proximity to illness, death, and disability, but nothing could have prepared her for the devastating injuries she sustained when a driver veered across the divide on the Golden Gate Bridge, crashing head on into her car.

Grace spent seven weeks in a coma, hovering on the precipice between life and death, like so many of her own patients. Ultimately, she awoke with her cognitive abilities miraculously intact, but her body was irreversibly impaired, leaving her wheelchair-bound and dependent on others for simple daily tasks. States of Grace, a documentary film about her profound transformation, picks up Grace’s story when she is discharged following a thirteen-month stay in rehabilitative hospitals. Members of NYU Langone Medical Center, including medical and nursing students as well as faculty and staff across all disciplines, were invited to attend a screening of the film and talkback with Dr.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

8th Annual Pediatric Bioethics Conference

8th Annual Pediatric Bioethics Conference
Friday, November 6, 2015 from 7:30 AM to 4:00 PM (EST)
Wolfson Children’s Hospital
University of North Florida, Herbert University Center, 12000 Alumni Drive, Jacksonville, FL 32224

Overview


Wolfson Children’s Hospital, in partnership with the University of North Florida and the Florida Bioethics Network, presents the Eighth Annual Pediatric Bioethics Conference.


With talks on pressing issues by experts in the field, the conference will serve as fertile ground for the development and elucidation of best practices in pediatric bioethics. This conference will include sessions on topics such as “medical futility,” “grappling with moral distress,” and “ethical issues in childhood immunizations.”


Why You Should Attend


Ethics committees, healthcare practitioners and public policy experts are consistently faced with difficult ethical challenges. This conference will provide education surrounding such challenges, and an opportunity to engage peers from across the region to learn what others are doing to cope with the ethical issues that arise in pediatric health care.


Who Should Attend


This course is designed for physicians, nurses, social workers, clergy, psychologists, health administrators, occupational therapists, speech therapists, pediatric mental health workers, pediatric specialists, medical students, nursing students, ethicists, philosophers, and others with an interest in pediatric bioethics.


Conference Program

7:30 – 8:25 am

  • Registration and Continental Breakfast


8:25 – 8:30 am

  • Welcoming Remarks Alissa Hurwitz Swota, PhD  Associate Professor, University of North Florida; Bioethicist, Wolfson Children’s Hospital; Director, Florida Blue Center for EthicsPlenary Sessions


8:30 – 9:30 am

  • Wolfson Lecture: Hope Lives Here: Working with Families Chasing Only a Chance for a Cure Wynne Morrison, MD, MBE Attending Physician, Critical Care and Palliative Care, The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia; Associate Professor, Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania


9:30 – 10:30 am

  • Spirituality and Decision Making for a Devastatingly Ill or Injured Child Mark Kuczewski, PhD  The Fr.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

Why Doctors Should Audio Record Patient Encounters

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

In Dave Eggers novel, The Circle, a behemoth tech company makes it popular for people to wear cameras and to live broadcast every minute of their lives (except for time in the bathroom). The goal is to remove secrets and to improve behavior because if you thought you were being watched all the time, you would always behave well (drawing on Bentham and Foucault’s ideas of the panopticon).

Much has been written about using cameras to protect ourselves. To combat racial injustice and claims of abuse, many police departments have adopted the use of body cams for officers. To ensure that seniors are being treated properly, cameras on their persons or in the nursing homes have been proposed. And of course, nanny cams have been in use for years.

A new JAMA article out of the University of Texas Health Science Center ask about patients and families secretly recording physician conversations. With cellphones and tablets, recording is quick, easy, and can be surreptitious. The article discusses the pluses (patients can revisit conversations, more accurate “notetaking,” knowing what’s going on when one is unconscious or family is not around) and minuses (attacking physician reputations on social media, creating evidence for a lawsuit). The authors recommend that if the physician suspects a patient or family member is recording a conversation, that the physician assents and takes this opportunity to improve communication. They suggest that the technology genie is out of the bottle and opposing is only likely to damage the physician-patient relationship.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

Figure 1: Global Medical Education and Collaboration in Real Time

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

When I was teaching in medical schools I recall a case where a student was reprimanded for breaking patient confidentiality by uploading a picture of surgery to his Facebook profile. This incident led to educational interventions about the appropriate use of social media in medicine. The short guideline was, “Never upload photos of patients onto the internet.” Now, physicians are encouraged to upload patient pictures through a service called Figure1, which has been described as “Instagram for doctors.”

Figure 1 is part of Medicine 2.0, using online technology to enable collaboration and interaction. Rather than simply reading about a medical condition, a user is able to comment, participate and offer advise.

The images are graphic and shocking. A glance through the Figure1 home page and Facebook page showed a foot covered in black spongy masses, a pink femur in a metal pan riddled with cancer, and a woman’s back covered in mushroom-like keloids. This is definitely not something to peruse while eating lunch.

With Figure1, health care professionals can (and do) upload medical images with commentary. These can be unusual teaching cases—the sort of things that rarely come along. Or they can be genuine requests for help—“does anyone know what this is?” A new feature is called “paging” where you can send questions and images to experts around the world for instant feedback.

The service offers education through an image of the week, name this condition, and interviews with experts. Their ambassador program recruits medical and nursing students to be advocates for the service on their campuses.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.