Tag: hospices

Bioethics News

Canadian Law that Excepts Religious Hospitals from Offering Assisted Deaths Disputed by Dying with Dignity

The Canadian not-for-profit Dying with Dignity is considering challenging provincial Ontario legislation that permits religiously affiliated hospitals to refrain from offering medically assisted death. Under current Ontario law, hospitals, hospices and long-term care centers that wish not to facilitate assisted death may refrain from doing so, and are instead obligated to transfer the patient to an alternative willing healthcare facility. In this respect, the legislation parallels hospitals’ option to electively refrain from performing abortions on ethical grounds outlined by the Catholic Health Alliance of Canada. Under a potentially emergent legal challenge, however, these publicly funded healthcare facilities could lose their permission to deny direct facilitation of a patient’s death.

As part of its rationale for challenging the law, Dying with Dignity cites the prospective trauma that a patient can further undergo if a transfer is necessary. The not-for-profit’s chief executive Shanaaz Gokool also stated that “what Ontario did is they gave an opt-out to basic and essential health care to hospitals that don’t want to provide for the dying.” Though it is challenging a healthcare facility’s legal right to refrain from assisting death, it maintains that individual healthcare providers ought to maintain that individual right.

To date, over 630 Ontarians have legally ended their lives with medical assistance. Time will tell whether in this potential legal conflict between religious and medical institutions, the law may yet facilitate higher numbers.

The post Canadian Law that Excepts Religious Hospitals from Offering Assisted Deaths Disputed by Dying with Dignity appeared first on Global Bioethics Initiative (GBI).

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics News

Dying At Home In An Opioid Crisis: Hospices Grapple With Stolen Meds

Nothing seemed to help the patient — and hospice staff didn’t know why. The answer came when the woman’s daughter, who was taking care of her at home, showed up in the emergency room with a life-threatening overdose of morphine and oxycodone. It turned out she was high on her mother’s medications, stolen from the hospice-issued stash

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

Medical Aid In Dying in Minnesota – Lessons Learned in Oregon and Colorado

Join me on Friday, September 29, 2017, for the MCDES Fall 2017 Conference: “Medical Aid in Dying (MAiD)—Lessons Learned in Oregon and Colorado.”


CEU’s will be available for professionals in Psychology, Marriage and Family Therapy, Social Work, Behavior Health and Therapy, Funeral Service and MN Nurses.


Speakers

  • David Grube, MD, is Board Certified in Family Medicine and retired after practicing for 35 years. He continues to teach medical students. He has been a leader in the Oregon Academy of Family Physicians and Oregon Academy of Family Physicians Foundation.
  • Kim Mooney, Certified Thanatologist, has 24 years of experience in the fi eld of dying, death, and grief. She has worked with hospices and as an independent consultant for corporations, faith communities, health care and mental health agencies. She lives and works in Colorado.
  • Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD, Director, Health Law Institute, Mitchell Hamline School of Law. He graduated from Georgetown University, where he received both his JD and a PhD in philosophy and bioethics.

Location
Doubletree by Hilton Hotel – Minneapolis North
Brooklyn Center, MN


Mission
To promote thoughtful deliberation about challenges faced by healthcare professionals and
healthcare systems as they create patient-centered policies to respond to medical aid in dying legislation and requests. We are neither promoting nor condemning aid in dying, but rather, focusing on how to achieve the best possible care for seriously ill patients and their families if medical aid in dying is legalized.


Pragmatic and Ethical Concerns

  1. How will practicing clinicians be educated to respond to requests for physician aid-in-dying, and to connect patients to resources, such as hospice and mental health, in the course of discussing these requests? 

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

Medical Aid In Dying in Minnesota – Lessons Learned in Oregon and Colorado

Join me on Friday, September 29, 2017, for the MCDES Fall 2017 Conference: “Medical Aid in Dying (MAiD)—Lessons Learned in Oregon and Colorado.”


CEU’s will be available for professionals in Psychology, Marriage and Family Therapy, Social Work, Behavior Health and Therapy, Funeral Service and MN Nurses.


Speakers

  • David Grube, MD, is Board Certified in Family Medicine and retired after practicing for 35 years. He continues to teach medical students. He has been a leader in the Oregon Academy of Family Physicians and Oregon Academy of Family Physicians Foundation.
  • Kim Mooney, Certified Thanatologist, has 24 years of experience in the fi eld of dying, death, and grief. She has worked with hospices and as an independent consultant for corporations, faith communities, health care and mental health agencies. She lives and works in Colorado.
  • Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD, Director, Health Law Institute, Mitchell Hamline School of Law. He graduated from Georgetown University, where he received both his JD and a PhD in philosophy and bioethics.

Location
Doubletree by Hilton Hotel – Minneapolis North
Brooklyn Center, MN


Mission
To promote thoughtful deliberation about challenges faced by healthcare professionals and
healthcare systems as they create patient-centered policies to respond to medical aid in dying legislation and requests. We are neither promoting nor condemning aid in dying, but rather, focusing on how to achieve the best possible care for seriously ill patients and their families if medical aid in dying is legalized.


Pragmatic and Ethical Concerns

  1. How will practicing clinicians be educated to respond to requests for physician aid-in-dying, and to connect patients to resources, such as hospice and mental health, in the course of discussing these requests? 

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

End of Life Doulas

Birth doulas have been supporting women through childbirth since the 1980s. In 2003, Henry Fersko-Weiss, co-founder of the International End of Life Doula Association (INELDA), adapted the philosophy, tools, and approaches used by birth doulas to create a program with a new kind of doula, an end-of-life doula, to support and guide people through the dying process. This new approach brings deeper meaning and greater comfort to dying people and their loved ones.


That first program created was highly successful and became the model for two additional hospice programs Fersko-Weiss built in New Jersey. Through these programs, hundreds of people have had the benefit of end-of-life doula services in the final days of life. In addition, the INELDA end-of-life doula principles and techniques have been presented in public trainings at the Open Center in New York City and the Institute for Traditional Medicine in Toronto, Canada.


INELDA, an international nonprofit organization, is the next step in the evolution of the end-of-life care approach. INELDA is dedicated to helping hospices build end-of-life doula programs. It is committed to setting the standard for end-of-life doulas and supporting them in their professional life. INELDA will also continue to research and develop new tools and techniques to further advance best practices in end-of-life care.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

The Death of Aid-in-Dying in DC

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

I recently gave a talk to a local chapter of a national physicians’ health care group where I was talking about what end of life could look like under a single payer health care system. Several of the attendees were advocates of aid-in-dying and were hoping I was going to talk about that issue as well. I did not as there was so much else to talk about regarding proposals for health care plans to replace the ACA and comparing death and dying in the US with countries that have a single-payer system (In short, no one is great at it; we aren’t doing so badly in comparison, and having a single payer system does not correlate with having good end of life).

As of the end of 2016, 5 US states have legalized aid-in-dying via legislation (CA, CO, OR, VT, WA) and 1 had a court ruling declaring it legal (MT). Thirty-seven states have specific laws against assisted suicide. Twenty-three states currently have bills under review to permit aid-in-dying.

The supporters of aid-in-dying at the talk were buoyed in attempts to pass such a law in Illinois by the recent efforts of Washington DC in passing their assisted suicide law. On December 19, 2017, DC Mayor Muriel Bowser signed an aid-in-dying bill that had been approved by the DC Council. Unlike states, laws passed by the DC government must be reviewed by Congress, who has a final say. Technically Congress governs DC and the local government only rules with Congress’s agreement, which can be withdrawn at any time.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics News

If Euthanasia Is a Right, Should Hospices Be Made to Kill?

December 21, 2016

(The Globe and Mail) – Is there any place for conscience in medicine? Currently, the technocratic answer is no. If the state says euthanasia is a right, then euthanasia there must be – and it must be provided everywhere, even by faith-based institutions and by groups that have pledged to care for the most vulnerable people in society. Dr. Constant Leung disagrees. He’s a family physician in Vancouver and his specialty is the elderly. He has persuaded hundreds of old, gravely ill people to accept palliative care in their last weeks or months of life.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics News

We Must Recapture the Spirit of the Hospice Revolution to Provide End-of-Life Care to All Who Need It

October 27, 2016

(The Telegraph) – Next year will mark 50 years since the hospice movement pioneer Cicely Saunders established St Christopher’s Hospice in south London, spearheading a transformation in care across the country. Today, more than 200 hospices deliver the highest quality of care to people with terminal conditions – over 90 per cent rated as “good” or “outstanding” by the Care Quality Commission in England. This quiet revolution did not have its origins in the NHS, or in local government, but among communities who came together to respond to the distressing deficit in care for the dying by the NHS of the 1960s.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

Assisting Persons in Hospice to Cast Early Absentee Ballots

by Steven H. Miles, MD

A friend of mine is dying of metastatic cancer. She does not have long to live; she will possibly die before the end of this year. Throughout her life, she actively participated in civic life. She donated her time and money to charities and political campaigns. She did not shirk a call to jury duty as many do. Disability from her illness has constrained her public life. She watches television when she is not too tired. She follows a prominent local race and a race for national office. This week, I will take her to city hall to cast her ballot for the 2016 election.

One might ask, ‘Why?’ A harsher perspective might even maintain that she should not vote because she will likely die soon after the election. She might even die before the election in which case, one might argue that her ballot is analogous to the extremely uncommon, but not apochryphal, stories of fraudulent ballots cast in the name of decedents. Such a story is now unfolding in Colorado, a ‘battleground’ state in the upcoming presidential election.[i] Depending on whether my friend dies soon after or before the election, one might argue that she has either a marginal stake or an illegitimate role in this election. Assisted voting, however legal or desired by her, is hardly to be commended and perhaps might be morally condemned. I disagree.

Dying persons have a variety of future-looking interests that survive them. In writing a will, they gift possessions to particular family members and charities so that those persons and organizations might be cared for and sustained by the the decedent.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

Innovative Approaches to End-of-Life Care (King’s Fund Conference))

The King’s Fund is producing an conference on September 22, 2016 in London: “Innovative Approaches to End-of-Life Care.”

This event will look at innovative approaches to palliative and end-of-life care. It will give you an overview of some of the national programs of work in this area and share lessons from good practice case studies in palliative care and local end-of-life care commissioning and delivery.

You’ll learn about measures including shared electronic records, partnerships between hospitals, hospices and services delivered in the community, and advance care planning, and how these can help you deliver the national ambitions for how palliative and end-of-life care should be delivered locally.

Opening session: End-of-life care – the national picture
Tracey Bleakley, Chief Executive, Hospice UK

National programme for end-of-life care
Hear about the work taking place at NHS England to support the delivery of end-of-life care across the country.
Jacquie White, Deputy Director for Long Term Conditions, Older People and End of Life Care, NHS England

Current and future challenges on death and dying in older adults
Julia will explore the challenges in improving end-of-life care for older people who make up over 70% of those who die.
Professor Julia Verne, Clinical Lead, National End of Life Care Intelligence Network, Public Health England

Making end-of-life care everybody’s business
Simon will talk about the work of Dying Matters and the National Council for Palliative Care in promoting public awareness of dying, death and bereavement.
Simon Chapman, Director of Policy and External Affairs, The National Council for Palliative Care and Dying Matters

Session two: Commissioning good end-of-life care

Making end-of-life care a priority in Merton
Learn how NHS Merton Clinical Commissioning Group went about developing a local end-of-life care strategy in partnership with health and social organisations, both statutory and voluntary.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.