Tag: health

Bioethics Blogs

A more ethical form of HIV criminalization

HIV has been criminalized throughout the history of the epidemic, or to be more exact, people living with HIV and their behaviors have been a persistent focus of criminal law. This was undoubtedly due in part to the fact that HIV initially was untreatable and infection (for the vast majority) spelt death. It was terrifying. But it wasn’t just an understandable public health reaction. Criminalization is not necessarily a wise way of controlling an epidemic, as it can be counterproductive, driving underground persons potentially subject to the laws. And there is no way of getting around that those disproportionately affected by HIV (especially in the USA), were considered ‘undesirables’ by many in the public and those leaders they voted for. Criminalization also reflected a moral panic against homosexuals and injection drug users. So, because it was not really based on solid public health principles or scientific evidence in the first place, it is unsurprising that states made laws covering actions highly unlikely to lead to transmission (like spitting or oral sex), fail to take the use of new prevention technologies (PreP, use of antiretrovirals) into account, and often don’t take into consideration the intention to cause harm. What is perhaps more surprising (and depressing) is that many of these laws are still on the books.  

I am thinking that HIV criminalization should not be abolished, but pointed in a better direction. Let me back up. For a few years now, I have been working on a NIH-funded project on the social and ethical dimensions of HIV cure research.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

How to make Nazi doctors

Most people who go into medicine have as at least part of their motivation the desire to help other people. I’m sure this was as true in 1930’s Germany as anywhere else. So how did a cadre of Nazi doctors come not only to commit crimes against humanity, but also to defend the moral correctness of their conduct when placed on trial for those crimes? The answer is complex, but one way was through the teaching of medical ethics.

An article in the April 18th Annals of Internal Medicine tells a cautionary tale for teachers and learners of bioethics. Entitled “Lectures on Inhumanity: Teaching Medical Ethics in German Medical Schools Under Nazism,” the article details how the Nazi party developed a curriculum for teaching ethics in medical schools that “was intended to explicitly create a ‘new type of physician’ . . . trained to internalize and then implement the Nazi biomedical vision . . . shifting the focus of ethical concern and medical care away from the individual patient and toward the general welfare of society or the people.” The curriculum included lectures in racial hygiene, the science of heredity, population policy, military medicine, and the history of medicine. Only long-standing members of the Nazi party were appointed lecturers. The lecturer at Berlin University, Rudolf Ramm, wrote the ethics textbook used in the curriculum, which emphasized physician paternalism in practicing their moral obligation to rid society of certain groups, and asserted that every (Aryan) person in Germany had a moral duty to stay healthy.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

Most-Cited Health Law Scholars (with an update on multiple authors)

By Mark A. Hall and I. Glenn Cohen Based on the law faculty citation analysis done by Greg Sisk, Brian Leiter has compiled “most-cited” rankings of tenured law faculty in a number of different subject areas, but not health law.  Naturally, … Continue reading

Source: Bill of Health, examining the intersection of law and health care, biotech & bioethics.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

Most-Cited Health Law Scholars (with an update on multiple authors)

By Mark A. Hall and I. Glenn Cohen Based on the law faculty citation analysis done by Greg Sisk, Brian Leiter has compiled “most-cited” rankings of tenured law faculty in a number of different subject areas, but not health law.  Naturally, … Continue reading

Source: Bill of Health, examining the intersection of law and health care, biotech & bioethics.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

Dueling BRCA Databases: What About the Patient?

The news release Monday morning grabbed my attention:

“Study finds wide gap in quality of BRCA1/2 variant
classification between Myriad Genetics and a common public database.”

Myriad Genetics had been exclusively providing tests, for
$3000+ a pop for full BRCA gene sequencing, for 17 years before the Supreme
Court invalidated key gene patents back in 2013. Since the ruling a dozen or so
competitors have been offering tests for much lower prices. Meanwhile, Myriad
has amassed a far deeper database than anyone else, having been in the business
so much longer. And it’s proprietary.

CLASSIFYING GENE VARIANTS

(NHGRI)

Public databases of variants of health-related genes have
been around for years too. The best known, ClinVar, collects and curates data
from the biomedical literature, expert panels, reports at meetings, testing
laboratories, and individual researchers, without access to Myriad’s database.
ClinVar uses several standard technical criteria to classify variants as
“pathogenic,” “benign,” or “of uncertain significance.” (“Likely pathogenic”
and “likely benign” were used more in the past.)

ClinVar lists 5400 variants just for BRCA1. The criteria
come from population statistics, how a particular mutation alters the encoded
protein, effects on the phenotype (symptoms), and other information.
Bioinformatics meets biochemistry to predict susceptibility. The BRCA1 protein
acts as a hub of sorts where many other proteins that control DNA repair
gather. DNA Science discussed the genes behind breast and ovarian cancers here.

As gene sequences accumulate in the databases and troops of
geneticists and genetic counselors annotate them, the proportion of pathogenic
and benign entries will increase as that of the unsettling “variants of
uncertain significance” — VUS — will decrease.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

Dueling BRCA Databases: What About the Patient?

The news release Monday morning grabbed my attention:

“Study finds wide gap in quality of BRCA1/2 variant
classification between Myriad Genetics and a common public database.”

Myriad Genetics had been exclusively providing tests, for
$3000+ a pop for full BRCA gene sequencing, for 17 years before the Supreme
Court invalidated key gene patents back in 2013. Since the ruling a dozen or so
competitors have been offering tests for much lower prices. Meanwhile, Myriad
has amassed a far deeper database than anyone else, having been in the business
so much longer. And it’s proprietary.

CLASSIFYING GENE VARIANTS

(NHGRI)

Public databases of variants of health-related genes have
been around for years too. The best known, ClinVar, collects and curates data
from the biomedical literature, expert panels, reports at meetings, testing
laboratories, and individual researchers, without access to Myriad’s database.
ClinVar uses several standard technical criteria to classify variants as
“pathogenic,” “benign,” or “of uncertain significance.” (“Likely pathogenic”
and “likely benign” were used more in the past.)

ClinVar lists 5400 variants just for BRCA1. The criteria
come from population statistics, how a particular mutation alters the encoded
protein, effects on the phenotype (symptoms), and other information.
Bioinformatics meets biochemistry to predict susceptibility. The BRCA1 protein
acts as a hub of sorts where many other proteins that control DNA repair
gather. DNA Science discussed the genes behind breast and ovarian cancers here.

As gene sequences accumulate in the databases and troops of
geneticists and genetic counselors annotate them, the proportion of pathogenic
and benign entries will increase as that of the unsettling “variants of
uncertain significance” — VUS — will decrease.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

Paid Sick Days: The Better Way

Kelly Holloway describes how changes to business practices concerning sick days can be beneficial for workers’ health and the economy.

__________________________________________

Most employees understand the case in favour of paid sick days. If you do not have them, you probably have to choose between staying home sick and losing pay or going to work sick and putting other people’s health at risk. But the steadfast counter argument to the campaign for paid sick days is that businesses suffer, especially small businesses. And when businesses suffer, the economy suffers.

A newly formed alliance, the Better Way to Build the Economy Alliance, is challenging the argument that legislated paid sick days are bad for the economy. It is doing so by bringing together employers who feel that paid sick days are actually good for businesses. More than that, the alliance claims that decent working conditions and a better minimum wage are good for the economy. This alliance of businesses and community leaders is helping to prove that investments like paid sick days and better wages result in higher levels of employee productivity and customer satisfaction.

“In a small business, you know your employees, and it’s rare, rare, that someone will abuse a paid sick day,” says Paul Hayman from Five Walls Realty in Guelph. “In fact, in my experience most of the time you have to tell someone to go home because they’re feeling sick.”

Toronto, 2016. Photo Credit: Kelly Holloway

Hayman, along with other employers, is featured in the Better Way videos, launched earlier this month.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

Global Health Policy: Trump and the Reinstatement of the Global Gag Rule

By: Jorge Luis Rivera-Agosto

On January 23, 2017, President Trump signed a Presidential Memorandum reinstating the so-called Mexico City Policy. The Memorandum conditions U.S. global health and family planning assistance to a strict rule that precludes foreign non-governmental organizations (also known as “NGOs”) from promoting or performing abortion as a method of family planning. Also known as the “global gag rule,” this policy represents a blow specifically to women’s health worldwide. Thanks to this new action, it will become harder, like in past years when it was in effect, to have resources to support family planning and reproductive health services, such as “family counseling, contraceptive commodities, condoms, and reproductive cancer screenings.” Even though the U.S. government won’t retract from the Memoranda until this Administration ceases, global efforts should be made to ameliorate the negative effects the new policy will cause.

The Mexico City Policy was first enacted by President Reagan in 1984 – and at the time, it represented an expansion of existing legislative restrictions of the use of U.S. funds for abortions internationally. It was then rescinded by President Clinton in 1991; reinstated by President Bush in 2001; rescinded by President Obama in 2009; and reinstated and expanded by President Trump in 2017. The policy requires foreign NGOs “to certify that they will not perform or actively promote abortion as a method of family planning, using funds from any source (including non-U.S. funds), as a condition for receiving U.S. government global family planning assistance and any other U.S. global health assistance.” The reason given to enact such policy was that the U.S.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

New Cochrane Review of Patient Decision Aids

There is now yet another new Cochrane review of the evidence on patient decision aids.  Here are the conclusions:

  • When people use decision aids, they improve their knowledge of the options (high-quality evidence) and feel better informed and more clear about what matters most to them (high-quality evidence). 
  • They probably have more accurate expectations of benefits and harms of options (moderate-quality evidence) and probably participate more in decision making (moderate-quality evidence). 
  • People who use decision aids may achieve decisions that are consistent with their informed values (evidence is not as strong; more research could change results). 
  • People and their clinicians were more likely to talk about the decision when using a decision aid. 
  • Decision aids have a variable effect on the option chosen, depending on the choice being considered. 
  • Decision aids do not worsen health outcomes, and people using them are not less satisfied. 
  • More research is needed to assess if people continue with the option they chose and also to assess what impact decision aids have on healthcare systems.

Source: bioethics.net, a blog maintained by the editorial staff of The American Journal of Bioethics.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.