Tag: government

Bioethics News

The Virginia Senate prohibits the government from penalising organisations that oppose same-sex marriage

On 9th February, the Virginia Senate approved a bill that would prevent people from being obliged to participate in “the solemnization of any marriage” and protect them from government discrimination for believing only in natural marriage between a man and a woman (same-sex couples, transgender people, single mothers). Senate law 1324, which was passed with 21 votes in favour to 19 against, strengthens the freedom of those who believe in natural marriage to live in accordance with their beliefs and prohibits the government from penalising organisations that oppose same-sex “marriage”. If it becomes law, non-profit organisations cannot be refused concessions or government funding solely based on their stance on marriage (see HERE).

La entrada The Virginia Senate prohibits the government from penalising organisations that oppose same-sex marriage aparece primero en Bioethics Observatory.

Source: Bioethics Observatory.

This article was originally published by the Bioethics Observatory of the Catholic University of Valencia. Up-to-date news and reports from the Bioethics Observatory at the Catholic University of Valencia (Spain), covering a wide range of bioethical issues including stem cell research, abortion, assisted suicide and much more. General interest and specialised topical articles with ethical implications, based on the latest research findings from some of the world's top medical and scientific journals.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics News

The Virginia Senate prohibits the government from penalising organisations that oppose same-sex marriage

On 9th February, the Virginia Senate approved a bill that would prevent people from being obliged to participate in “the solemnization of any marriage” and protect them from government discrimination for believing only in natural marriage between a man and a woman (opposed to same-sex couples, transgender people, single mothers). Senate law 1324, which was passed with 21 votes in favour to 19 against, strengthens the freedom of opponents same-sex marriage to live in accordance with their beliefs and prohibits the government from penalising them. The law states that non-profit organisations cannot be refused concessions or government funding solely based on their stance on marriage (see HERE).

View more HERE

La entrada The Virginia Senate prohibits the government from penalising organisations that oppose same-sex marriage aparece primero en Bioethics Observatory.

Source: Bioethics Observatory.

This article was originally published by the Bioethics Observatory of the Catholic University of Valencia. Up-to-date news and reports from the Bioethics Observatory at the Catholic University of Valencia (Spain), covering a wide range of bioethical issues including stem cell research, abortion, assisted suicide and much more. General interest and specialised topical articles with ethical implications, based on the latest research findings from some of the world's top medical and scientific journals.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics News

Wounded Troops Discharged for Misconduct Often Had PTSD or TBI

Three-fifths of troops discharged from the military for misconduct in recent years had a diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injury or another associated condition, according to a report released Tuesday by the Government Accountability Office

Source: Bioethics Bulletin by the Berman Institute of Bioethics.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

Oxford Uehiro Prize in Practical Ethics: The Ethical Dilemma of Youth Politics, written by Andreas Masvie

 This essay was the runner up in the undergraduate category of the Oxford Uehiro Prize in Practical Ethics 2017

Written by University of Oxford Student, Andreas Masvie

 

The West in general, and perhaps Europe in particular, tend to celebrate youth politics as a vital force of democracy. This is reflected in the current literature on youth politics, which appears to be almost exclusively descriptive (e.g. ‘What is the level of youth politics in country X?’) or positively normative (e.g. ‘How can country X heighten engagement in youth politics?’). Various youth councils and parliaments are encouraged and empowered by government as well as civil society, both at local and national level. This is also the case internationally. The UN, for instance, demands that youth politics be stimulated: “[Such] engagement and participation is central to achieving sustainable human development.”[1] I will approach the rationale of this collective celebration as a syllogism, defining ‘youth politics’ as organized political engagement of people aged 13–25:

P1        Youth politics increases the level of political engagement;

P2        Political engagement promotes democratic vitality and sustainability; thus

C1        Youth politics promotes democratic vitality and sustainability.

In this paper I am interested in challenging P2. Does the increased political engagement due to youth politics promote democratic vitality and sustainability? For the sake of argument, I will posit the trueness of P1. When it comes to P2: it would be difficult to argue that all forms of political engagement promote democratic vitality and sustainability (e.g. authoritarian neo-Nazism or revolutionary Communism). Hence, I shall take it for granted that P2 is constrained to activities and policies compatible with democracy.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

Ethics & Society Newsfeed: May 5, 2017

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Politics

What Obama’s Former Ethics Counsel Thinks of Trump
Norm Eisen, former ethics counsel to President Obama and co-founder of Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington (CREW) discusses the ethical issues of the Trump administration’s first 100 days.

White House aims for Thursday signing of religious liberty executive order
A win for conservatives, especially the Vice President, the new religious liberty executive order is expected to be signed Thursday.

Ethics office says it wasn’t consulted about Ivanka Trump job
Ivanka Trump was brought on as a White House adviser without consulting the Office of Government Ethics.

State Department Promotes Ivanka Trump’s Book In Another Ethics Blunder
A State Department office retweeted post promoting Ivanka Trump’s new book despite federal rule that bars the use of public office for private gain.

Bioethics and Medical Ethics

This New App Is Tinder For Sperm And Egg Donors
“The ethical and legal complexities of egg-shopping.”

Jimmy Kimmel’s powerful, poignant Obamacare plea crystallizes the GOP’s dilemma
Late-night host Jimmy Kimmel made an emotional plea to lawmakers to fund health-care spending for preexisting conditions, discussing his newborn son Billy’s heart condition on his show.

Firestorm brewing as scientists work to create synthetic human DNA
Scientists say that synthesized human DNA could be a reality in as little as 5 years, invoking ethical questions and concerns.

Informed Consent Becoming More Difficult?
“The recent decision in Ike White v. David Beeks, M.D., has threatened to turn this consent process on its head, especially if it were to be adopted in other states.”

5 things to know about infertility treatments
Treatment for infertility can be expensive and clinics are scarce, calling into question ethics issues.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

Rethinking The Obligation To Provide Universal Healthcare Coverage: The need for moral imagination

Healthcare is indeed complicated, in case anyone with a
speck of knowledge about it ever thought otherwise. There are many ways to
organize a healthcare system, as is evident from all the various ways advanced
industrial societies around the globe provide healthcare to their citizens.
Questions about the extent to which the private insurance system versus the
government is involved brings us back to protracted debates about the legitimate
role of government and whether or not citizens have a basic right to healthcare,
or should healthcare be assumed to be one more market service which individuals
may elect to use or not? Sadly, in the United States these questions often are
framed in abstract terms appealing to general ideological values and goals that
shape and limit the range of viable policy options. What I want to emphasize in
my blog today is the need for moral imagination—what’s it like to be in the
shoes of those who are suffering, and often without health insurance, and
without a job?  This is a first step we
all must take before we can weigh our moral obligations to provide healthcare
to everyone.

Before the passage of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) there
were over 45 million uninsured Americans who did not have access to a primary
care physician. That number has been reduced by about 18 million, but now we at
risk of seeing this number rise again with the possibility of a repeal of the
ACA and passage of a GOP led alternative. The Congressional Budget Office
(CBO), a politically independent agency, estimated that if the American
Health Care Act had past would eventually lead to 24 million people loosing
their health care insurance by 2026.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

Rethinking The Obligation To Provide Universal Healthcare Coverage: The need for moral imagination

Healthcare is indeed complicated, in case anyone with a
speck of knowledge about it ever thought otherwise. There are many ways to
organize a healthcare system, as is evident from all the various ways advanced
industrial societies around the globe provide healthcare to their citizens.
Questions about the extent to which the private insurance system versus the
government is involved brings us back to protracted debates about the legitimate
role of government and whether or not citizens have a basic right to healthcare,
or should healthcare be assumed to be one more market service which individuals
may elect to use or not? Sadly, in the United States these questions often are
framed in abstract terms appealing to general ideological values and goals that
shape and limit the range of viable policy options. What I want to emphasize in
my blog today is the need for moral imagination—what’s it like to be in the
shoes of those who are suffering, and often without health insurance, and
without a job?  This is a first step we
all must take before we can weigh our moral obligations to provide healthcare
to everyone.

Before the passage of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) there
were over 45 million uninsured Americans who did not have access to a primary
care physician. That number has been reduced by about 18 million, but now we at
risk of seeing this number rise again with the possibility of a repeal of the
ACA and passage of a GOP led alternative. The Congressional Budget Office
(CBO), a politically independent agency, estimated that if the American
Health Care Act had past would eventually lead to 24 million people loosing
their health care insurance by 2026.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

Four Reasons Canada Needs Universal Pharmacare

Steve Morgan gives us four reasons to support universal pharmacare and then invites us to sign the Parliamentary Petition e-959 (Health care services).

__________________________________________

Ontario has just announced that it will offer a publicly funded pharmacare program for children and youth in the province. This is a small step in the right direction, one that is arguably most important for its symbolism in a national debate.

Why just a small step? Because Ontario is adding universal, comprehensive pharmacare coverage to the age group that least uses medicines. Many working-age Ontarians, who are far more likely to require medicines than children, will not be insured.

Why symbolic? Ontario’s new pharmacare program is evidence of at least one government taking responsibility for this component of health care, integrating it with medical and hospital care.

Several national commissions on Canada’s health care system have recommended adding prescription drugs to our publicly funded universal medicare system. To date, however, no federal government has acted on those recommendations.

By creating ‘pharmacare-junior,’ Premier Wynne and Minister Hoskins are, in essence, calling on the federal government to help finish the job by creating a pharmacare program for all Canadians of all ages.

Here are four reasons why Canada needs a universal, public pharmacare program – and what Canadians can do to make it happen.

The most important reason for universal pharmacare in Canada is that access to essential medicines is a human right according to the World Health Organization (WHO). The WHO recommends that countries protect that right in law and with pharmaceutical policies that work in conjunction with their broader systems of universal health coverage.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

In the Journals – April 2017 by Danya Glabau

Critical Public Health

On difference and doubt as tools for critical engagement with public health

Catherine M. Will

This paper argues that critical public health should reengage with public health as practice by drawing on versions of Science and Technology Studies (STS) that ‘de-centre the human’ and by seeking alternative forms of critique to work inspired by Foucault. Based on close reading of work by Annemarie Mol, John Law, Vicky Singleton and others, I demonstrate that these authors pursue a conversation with Foucault but suggest new approaches to studying contemporary public health work in different settings. Proposing that we ‘doubt’ both the unity of public health and its effects, I argue that this version of STS opens up a space to recognise multiplicity; to avoid idealising what is being criticised; and to celebrate or care for public health practices as part of critique. Finally I oppose the view that considering technologies, materials and microbes leads to micro-level analysis or political neutrality, and suggest that it allows us to reframe studies of public health to account for inequalities and to draw attention to weak or retreating states, active markets and the entangled relations of humans and non-humans across the world.

 

Biopolitical precarity in the permeable body: the social lives of people, viruses and their medicines

Elizabeth Mills

This article is based on multi-sited ethnography that traced a dynamic network of actors (activists, policy-makers, health care systems, pharmaceutical companies) and actants (viruses and medicines) that shaped South African women’s access to, and embodiment of, antiretroviral therapies (ARVs).

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

Shouldn’t Dead Be Dead?: The Search for a Uniform Definition of Death

Check out “Shouldn’t Dead Be Dead?: The Search for a Uniform Definition of Death” in the latest Journal of Law Medicine & Ethics 45(1). 


NYU authors Ariane Lewis, Katherine Cahn-Fuller, and Arthur Caplan conclude:


“It is clear that variation in the definitions of death throughout the United States persists. The Hailu case introduced a medical, ethical, and legal quandary by questioning the medical determination of death and setting a legal precedent that the Harvard criteria for brain death should be treated as the only accepted medical standard for brain death determination, despite the fact that these criteria have been replaced by the AAN guidelines.  Variations in the definition of death yields uncertainty and confusion and can undermine public trust in both medicine and the law.”


“The President’s Commission for the Study of Ethical Problems in Medicine and Biomedical and Behavioral Research recognized that it was imperative that the definition of death be identical throughout the United States. While they felt that individual states should have laws about the definition of death, they noted the role of the federal government in defining death was to ‘usefully bring together experts and representatives of different streams of thought on the matter [to] clarify support,’ such as was the case in both the Hailu and McMath cases, so that practices in such situations are uniform and thus understood by families, the media and the public.”


“The Commission hoped that the UDDA would prompt homogeneous medical and legal  management of all decedents, but it is clear that this goal has not been achieved.”

Source: bioethics.net, a blog maintained by the editorial staff of The American Journal of Bioethics.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.