Tag: administrators

Bioethics Blogs

More than Local Arrangements: How Conference Logistics Can Speak to Values by Sarah Pickman

In the fall of 2016, my colleagues Tess Lanzarotta, Marco Ramos, and I met as the core organizers for the “Critical Histories, Activist Futures” conference to hammer out our individual roles. We decided that I would take on the role of head of local arrangements, managing all of the practical logistics for the conference: food, room reservations, registration, etc. “Local arrangements” is, at first glance, a series of crucial but unsexy grunt work tasks. Perhaps, at this very moment, images from your own past of stacking folding chairs and wrestling with projector cords are beginning to swirl in your head at the mention of this phrase. Before you roll your eyes and click away, let me try to convince you that local arrangements can be a productive space to think about what an academic conference looks like and who it is for, as well as to grapple with the limits of the conference as a model for academic discourse.

I embraced the role initially because I do feel strongly that in order for an event to achieve its objectives, the mundane aspects must be taken care of and must run as seamlessly as possible. Prior experience organizing events has taught me that no matter how interesting and well-presented a symposium or lecture’s content is, if there is not enough food served afterwards or the room is very cold that’s all anyone will talk about. This is to say nothing of my own personal experience as a graduate student, scooping up free sandwiches at events and watching my professors race each other to the coffee dispenser during break times.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

In the Journals – August 2017 by Livia Garofalo

Here is the article round-up for August, put together in collaboration with Ann Marie Thornburg.  There is a special issue section of Social Science and Medicine out this month on Austerity, Health, and Wellbeing (abstracts below). Also of note is a recent ‘Takes a Stand’ statement on the End of AIDS published in Global Public Health by Nora Kenworthy, Richard Parker, and Matthew Thomann. You can take advantage of the article being temporarily free access and on early view here. Enjoy!

 

Cultural Anthropology (Open Access)

Tangles of Care: Killing Goats to Save Tortoises on the Galápagos Islands

Paolo Bocci

If calls to care for other species multiply in a time of global and local environmental crisis, this article demonstrates that caring practices are not always as benevolent or irenic as imagined. To save endemic tortoises from the menace of extinction, Proyecto Isabela killed more than two hundred thousand goats on the Galápagos Islands in the largest mammal eradication campaign in the world. While anthropologists have looked at human engagements with unwanted species as habitual and even pleasurable, I discuss an exceptional intervention that was ethically inflected toward saving an endemic species, yet also controversial and distressing. Exploring eradication’s biological, ecological, and political implications and discussing opposing practices of care for goats among residents, I move past the recognition that humans live in a multispecies world and point to the contentious nature of living with nonhuman others. I go on to argue that realizing competing forms of care may help conservation measures—and, indeed, life in the Anthropocene—to move beyond the logic of success and failure toward an open-ended commitment to the more-than-human.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

The Spirit of the Socratic Method: How Do You Train New Administrators When “it depends?”

PRIM&R invited members of our Emerging Professionals Working Group (EPWG) to write about topics of relevance to their work and to the research ethics community. We hope these posts open conversations among research ethics oversight professionals at all points in their careers. In this post, Tonya Ferraro shares how the Socratic Method of instruction—interactive dialogue and questioning—can be a helpful tool when training new administrators.

The post The Spirit of the Socratic Method: How Do You Train New Administrators When “it depends?” appeared first on Ampersand.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

Advance Care Planning and End of Life (ACPEL) Conference

The program for the 2017 Advance Care Planning and End of Life (ACPEL) Conference in Banff is now available.


Pre-Conference Sessions (Part 1)
Session 1: CRIO 
1. How do people with disabilities perceive advance care planning – Robin Gray, University of Calgary


2. Differences in survey methodology of two Advance Care Planning survey polls conducted in Alberta, Canada – Sunita Ghosh, Alberta Health Services-CancerControl


3. Efficacy of Advance Care Planning and Goals of Care Designations Discussions: A Randomized Controlled Trial and Video Intervention – Maureen Douglas, University of Alberta
  
4. Identification of indicators to monitor successful implementation of Advance Care Planning policies: a modified Delphi study – Patricia Biondo, University of Calgary

5. The economics of advance care planning, Konrad Fassbender, University of Alberta; Covenant Health

Session 2: Health Care Consent, Advance Care Planning, and Goals of Care: The Challenge to Get It Right in Ontario

Health Care Consent, Advance Care Planning, and Goals of Care: The Challenge to Get It Right in Ontario – Tara Walton, Ontario Palliative Care Network Secretariat

Session 3: How to Invite Clinicians to Initiate ACP

1. How to Invite Clinicians to Initiate ACP to Residents, Patients, and Family Carers? – Luc Deliens  
  
2. Development of a complex intervention to support the initiation of advance care planning by general practitioners in patients at risk of deteriorating or dying: a phase 0-1 study – Aline De Vleminck, Free University of Brussels & Ghent University

Pre-Conference Sessions (Part 2)

Session 1: Faith Based Workshop

Inviting the voice of Spirituality within the conversation of Advanced Care Planning – Thomas Butler, Bon Secours Health System Inc.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

Ethics, sexuality, and dementia in long-term care

Alisa Grigorovich and Pia Kontos suggest that long-term care residents with dementia can benefit from leisure and social activities that are supportive of sexual expression and the formation of intimate and romantic relationships.

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Recently, media stories on dementia have focused on the sexualities of persons living with dementia in residential long-term care settings, such as nursing homes. This media attention has been predominantly negative, consisting of descriptions of sexual violence, and apocalyptic warnings of the legal, ethical, and moral dangers of allowing persons with dementia to express their sexuality.

Often the primary criterion used to determine whether sexual encounters between residents with dementia are involuntary is the cognitive ability of the female resident. Frequently, she is characterized as globally incapable of agreeing to sexual activity because of cognitive impairment.

Consider, for example, the now infamous case of Henry Rayhons. He was accused (and ultimately acquitted) of sexually assaulting his wife who had dementia. As well, there is the lawsuit filed in a case involving two residents with dementia who had intercourse while living in Windmill Manor. While such stories highlight the importance of protecting vulnerable persons from sexual abuse, they ignore the need to also ensure that persons with dementia have opportunities to pursue intimate and romantic relationships.

Sexual expression is a universal human need that transcends age and disability. It has many positive health and wellness benefits, including the opportunity to experience pleasure, decreased pain sensitivity, and increased relaxation. However, older persons living in nursing homes often experience reduced sexual freedom.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

Reading into the Science: The Neuroscience and Ethics of Enhancement

By Shweta Sahu
Image courtesy of Pexels.

I was always an average student: I was good, just not good enough. I often wondered what my life and grades would be like if I’d had a better memory or learned faster. I remember several exams throughout my high school career where I just could not recall what certain rote memorization facts or specific details were, and now in college, I realize that if I could somehow learn faster, how much time would I save and be able to study even more? Would a better memory have led me to do better on my exams in high school, and would my faster ability to learn new information have increased my GPA?

Such has been the question for years now in the ongoing debates of memory enhancement and cognitive enhancement, respectively. I’m not the only student to have ever felt this way and I’m sure I won’t be the last. Technology and medicine seem to be on the brink of exciting new findings, ones that may help us in ways we’ve never before thought imaginable.
Though neuroscientists are still attempting to understand the intricacies of how memory functions, it has been known since the early 1900’s that memory works in three modes: working memory, short-term memory, and long term memory, each of which are regionalized to different parts of the brain. Working memory, which lasts from seconds to minutes, contains information that can be acted on and processed, not merely maintained by rehearsal. Short term memory on the other hand, is slightly longer in duration and occurs in the prefrontal cortex (think George Miller’s Magic number 7).

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

CHALLENGING TIMES FOR LONG-TERM CARE STAFF

Mary Jo Bernard and Jodie Penwarden call for a review of practices and policies that contribute to hostile working and living conditions in long-term care facilities.

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Violence is on the rise in long-term care facilities. This is due to both an increase in ‘challenging behaviours’ on the part of residents and an increase in the number of front-line staff working alone due to staff shortages. Often, when workers are ill or injured (sometimes as a direct result of rushing through physical labour all day long), their shifts are not covered.

When there are not enough trained staff on the floor, the residents suffer. They sit in soiled clothing with their call bells ringing, they are rushed through unpleasant meal times, and they are pushed in a commode to their shower through common space in nothing but a towel. Meanwhile, staff become demoralized and the environment risks becoming hostile.

A case from O’Leary, Prince Edward Island, first reported in the spring of 2015, demonstrates how a culture of hostility in long-term care facilities can result in poor quality care.

During the summer of 2016, a resident care worker at a government-funded long-term care facility was fired by Health P.E.I after sharing a photo (which is described as a ‘head shot’) of a deceased resident via Snapchat. Health P.E.I. launched an investigation into the incident and learned a number of disturbing facts. The photo that was shared included an inappropriate caption and was forwarded to someone outside of the workplace. As well, over a period of months, the employee in question had shared numerous other photos of vulnerable residents while they were eating, sleeping, or receiving care after a bowel movement.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

Pornography as a Public Health Issue

Jacqueline Gahagan advocates for a national sexual health promotion strategy.

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Pornography is concerned with the development and the circulation of sexually explicit books, magazines, videos, art, and music aimed at creating sexual excitement. Public health is concerned with keeping people healthy and preventing illness, injury and premature death. With the growing use of internet-based pornography and the relative ease by which it can be accessed, the effects of “online violent and degrading sexually explicit material on children, women and men” have become an important public health issue. This issue is best addressed through the development and introduction of a national sexual health promotion strategy – a strategy that includes current and comprehensive sexual health education in our primary, secondary, and post-secondary schools.

Health promotion, in concert with public health, involves encouraging safe behaviours and improving health through healthy public policy, community-based interventions, active public participation, advocacy, and action on key determinants of health. I am confident that several of these strategies can be used to address concerns about the ready access to internet-based pornography. For example, health promotion initiatives that take a harm reduction approach to healthy sexuality include an emphasis on screening and testing for sexually transmitted infections, the use of condoms, a shared understanding of consensual sex, as well as the use of other safer sex interventions.

A review of existing sexual health education in Canadian schools, however, reveals that many Canadian youth do not receive the level of sexual health education they need to help them make informed decisions about sexual risk-taking.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

Webinar Follow-up: Research with Children and Adolescents in Elementary and Secondary Schools

In February, PRIM&R hosted Research with Children and Adolescents in Elementary and Secondary Schools, a webinar presented by Shannon Sewards, MA, CIP, and Julie Slayton, PhD, JD. This webinar provided strategies for IRB administrators and staff who work closely with research in public school settings to determine IRB review and risk levels for protocols, understand and implement best practices for research in the classroom, and support and guide investigators on regulatory and logistical matters.

The post Webinar Follow-up: Research with Children and Adolescents in Elementary and Secondary Schools appeared first on Ampersand.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

Alice Street’s “Biomedicine in an Unstable Place: Infrastructure and Personhood in a Papua New Guinean Hospital” by Mackenzie Cramblit

Biomedicine in an Unstable Place: Infrastructure and Personhood in a Papua New Guinean Hospital

by Alice Street

Duke University Press, 2014, 204 pages

Social anthropologist Alice Street’s first book is an ambitious ethnography of personhood and recognition in Madang Hospital, an under-resourced provincial hospital in Papua New Guinea. The book shows how doctors, nurses, and patients endeavor to make themselves “visible” to others in order to initiate relations of care at multiple scales, while also emphasizing the uncertainties of diagnosis and treatment within an institution subject to perennial shortages of staff and supplies.

The book’s main section explores the treatment and experience of disease within the public ward of Madang Hospital. Street introduces the concept of “biomedical uncertainty” to describe how doctors must forego conclusive diagnosis and embrace a pragmatic approach to treating patients in an under-resourced setting. That this kitchen-sink method is the one best suited to the circumstances at Madang Hospital seems reasonable – after all, the doctors themselves say so. But Street’s optimistic claim that this “uncertainty…is another productive form that biomedical knowledge can take” and her apparent endorsement of what she terms “technologies of not knowing” feels out of step with the real ways doctors in this environment struggle to produce care amidst difficult constraints (111). What should be commended is the Madang doctors’ commitment to take action in spite of the prevailing biomedical uncertainty in their ward, not the uncertainty itself ­– the unenviable result of chronic resource shortages. It would seem essential to distinguish between this kind of uncertainty on the one hand and a positive strategy of diagnostic suppleness or nonclosure on the other.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.