Category: Bioethics Blogs

Bioethics Blogs

Fertility preservation for transgender individuals

The field of oncofertility emerged to preserve the fertility
of cancer patients whose treatment might render them as infertile or sterile.
Today, the field of fertility preservation has expanded to other patient
populations whose medical treatment may affect their fertility. One such
population is transgender individuals undergoing gender affirming treatments.
Although research on transgender individuals is limited overall and in
particular regarding issues surrounding reproduction, transgender individuals
are interested in biological reproduction. Because various gender affirming
treatments will permanently affect their fertility, such as hormonal treatment
and surgical removal of the gonads, it is important for transgender individuals
to be offered fertility preservation before they start these treatments.

There are, however, some factors that may make fertility
preservation difficult or less attractive of an option for transgender
individuals. Healthcare professionals offering fertility preservation should be
aware of these factors so they can help mitigate them. Here I will discuss two
of them.

First, undergoing fertility preservation treatment can be
stressful for both transgender and cisgender people, but there are some unique
challenges for transgender individuals. Individuals with gender dysphoria may
find it particularly difficult to undergo procedures involving anatomy that is
discordant with their identity. For example, transgender women who are asked to
retrieve sperm via masturbation may find this request exacerbates their gender
dysphoria and may not be possible to do. Transgender men who are asked to
undergo vaginal ultrasounds may find this psychologically traumatic. In
recognizing how fertility preservation treatment can be particularly difficult
for transgender individuals, healthcare professionals should be prepared to
find ways to alleviate these difficulties, such as by offering surgical methods
of sperm retrieval for transgender women and sedating transgender men during
vaginal ultrasounds.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

Creative Minds: Rapid Testing for Antibiotic Resistance

Ahmad (Mo) Khalil

The term “freeze-dried” may bring to mind those handy MREs (Meals Ready to Eat) consumed by legions of soldiers, astronauts, and outdoor adventurers. But if one young innovator has his way, a test that features freeze-dried biosensors may soon be a key ally in our nation’s ongoing campaign against the very serious threat of antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections.

Each year, antibiotic-resistant infections account for more than 23,000 deaths in the United States. To help tackle this challenge, Ahmad (Mo) Khalil, a researcher at Boston University, recently received an NIH Director’s New Innovator Award to develop a system that can more quickly determine whether a patient’s bacterial infection will respond best to antibiotic X or antibiotic Y—or, if the infection is actually viral rather than bacterial, no antibiotics are needed at all.

To build the foundation for his new diagnostic approach, Khalil is sequencing the transcriptomes of a variety of bacterial strains to analyze their genomic response to various antibiotics. He then uses that information to produce a panel of RNA sensors specific to each particular bacterial strain, and freeze-dries those sensors onto strips of testing paper, creating what he thinks will be a highly specific diagnostic test with a very long shelf life.

As Khalil envisions it, the clinical use of his test would involve obtaining a sample of infected material from a patient and exposing the sample to a certain antibiotic. After about 20 minutes, the sample’s cells would be lysed and the resulting solution placed on the test strip. That liquid would serve to reconstitute the freeze-dried RNA sensor reactions embedded on the paper, and those sensors would light up if the sample contains a bacterium that is a good candidate for the antibiotic.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

Webinar Follow-Up: Introduction to Research Misconduct for IACUC, IRB, and IBC Professionals

In May, PRIM&R hosted the webinar Introduction to Research Misconduct for IACUC, IRB, and IBC Professionals. This webinar provided foundational knowledge in research misconduct for regulatory professionals who work in the human subjects protections and animal care and use fields. After the webinar, one of the presenters, Jim Kroll, PhD, responded to some of the attendee questions that time didn’t permit us to answer live. We’re pleased to share those answers with the readers of Ampersand.

The post Webinar Follow-Up: Introduction to Research Misconduct for IACUC, IRB, and IBC Professionals appeared first on Ampersand.

Source: Ampersand, the blog of PRIM&R.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

Book review: Traces of the Future: An Archaeology of Medical Science in Africa by Damien Droney

Traces of the Future: An Archaeology of Medical Science in Africa

Paul Wenzel Geissler, Guillaume Lachenal, John Manton, and Noémi Tousignant, editors

Intellect Ltd./University of Chicago Press, 2016, 256 pages, 500 color plates

 

The first reaction to an encounter with Traces of the Future: An Archaeology of Medical Science in Africa is likely to be a set of questions. Firstly, “what is it?” This 7×9” hardcover book, brimming with pleasingly displayed full-color photographic contributions by 18 authors, resembles a museum exhibit as much as it does a conventional academic volume. The contributing authors themselves describe it as a “sutured assemblage” (12) and a “fragmentary and idiosyncratic” (27) result of collaborative research presented in “a book-like package” (12).

Traces of the Future is the remarkable product of a long-term collaborative research project by a group of anthropologists, historians, and photographers. It examines the legacies of twentieth century biosciences in Africa in five historical sites of transnational medical science. Each of these sites manifested dreams of medical modernity and social progress characteristic of the twentieth century, dreams which are unevenly remembered in these sites today. The book is driven by the diverse research objects that it assembles. Beyond some rewarding orienting essays, the bulk of the book appears as a profusion of material. Each chapter includes an array of images, including fieldwork snapshots, archival documents, blueprints, manuscripts of musical scores, and unearthed beakers. These images are interspersed with timelines, interview transcripts, fieldnote excerpts, quotes from academic literature, and essays.

It also features haunting professional art photographs of Amani Hill Research Station by Evgenia Arbugaeva and Mariele Neudecker.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

Procedural aspects of compulsory licensing under TRIPS

I am very happy to host yet another webinar with J. Wested at the University of Copenhagen. This time we will debate procedural issues in compulsory licensing with H. Grosse Ruse-Kahn (University of Cambridge) & M. Desai (Eli Lilly). Further information on … Continue reading

Source: Bill of Health, examining the intersection of law and health care, biotech & bioethics.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

Critical Care Nurses Urge Physicians Not Allow Families to Override Patient Wishes. Many

A new study in the July/August 2017 Dimensions of Critical Care Nursing  reports suggestions from 500 critical care nurses on how to improve end-of-life care obstacles.  


Major themes include:

  • Ensuring characteristics of a good death
  • Improving physician communication with patients and families
  • Adjusting nurse-to-patient ratios to 1:1
  • Recognizing and avoiding futile care
  • Increasing EOL education
  • Physicians who are present and ‘‘on the same page”
  • Need for more support staff
  • Not allowing families to override patients’ wishes

I want to second this final suggestion.  In my discussions with nurses this is a very common question.  The study’s quotes are consistent with my own experience:

  • “The most troubling aspect is when patients’ wishes are not followed.”
  • “Respect patients’ wishes NOT families!”
  • “Follow the patient’s DNR/POLST form regardless of the family’s wishes. The patient filled it out for a reason.”
As I have written several times, surrogates who contradict the patient’s own instructions or wishes can and should be replaced.  

Source: bioethics.net, a blog maintained by the editorial staff of The American Journal of Bioethics.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

Jaime King on ‘The Week in Health Law’ Podcast

By Nicolas Terry and Frank Pasquale Subscribe to TWIHL here! Hastings law professor and antitrust expert Jaime King joins us to discuss competition and consolidation in healthcare delivery. We discussed (apparently) pro-competitive collaborations, price transparency models, the limits of demand-side reforms, Gobeille’s interpretation of … Continue reading

Source: Bill of Health, examining the intersection of law and health care, biotech & bioethics.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

Psychedelic Medicine – New Frontiers in Palliative Care

Exciting new research is revealing that psychedelic drugs, such as psilocybin and MDMA, may offer significant benefit for patients struggling at the end of life and those beset by major depressions and treatment-resistant post-traumatic stress. 


A conference at the University of Washington School of Law, on October 27, 2017, brings together doctors, scientific researchers, attorneys and ethicists to consider the medical, legal and ethical implications of this evolving research.


Confirmed speakers include:

  • Dan Abrahamson, Senior Legal Advisor, Drug Policy Alliance’s Office of Legal Affairs, Oakland, CA
  • Ira Byock, M.D., Founder and Chief Medical Officer, Providence Institute for Human Caring, Torrance, CA
  • Rick Doblin, Founder and Executive Director of Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies, Boston, MA
  • Representative Roger Goodman, Washington State Legislature, Kirkland, WA
  • Sam Kamin, marijuana law reform expert and Slate series author of “Altered States: Inside Colorado’s Marijuana Economy,” Professor of Law, University of Denver, Denver, CO
  • Patricia Kuszler, Charles I. Stone Professor of Law, University of Washington School of Law, Seattle, WA
  • Don Lattin, award-winning author and journalist, author of Changing our Minds—Psychedelic Sacraments and the New Psychotherapy, adjunct faculty, Graduate School of Journalism, University of California at Berkeley, CA
  • Lynn Mehler, partner, Hogan Lovells, Pharmaceutical and Biotechnology practice, Washington, DC
  • Leanna Standish, Ph.D., School of Naturopathic Medicine, Bastyr University, Seattle, WA
  • Kathryn Tucker, Executive Director, End of Life Liberty Project

Source: bioethics.net, a blog maintained by the editorial staff of The American Journal of Bioethics.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

Introducing Common Rule Webinar Series Blog Squad Member Amelia Walch-Patterson

For those of us in human research protections, the Common Rule changes were the most hotly anticipated item of 2016. The unveiling of the final changes on January 19, 2017 has been, for so many of us, a source of confusion, consternation, stress, and in some cases, relief. As technology and science have advanced at […]

The post Introducing Common Rule Webinar Series Blog Squad Member Amelia Walch-Patterson appeared first on Ampersand.

Source: Ampersand, the blog of PRIM&R.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.

Bioethics Blogs

Ethics of Transparent Pharmaceutical Pricing Laws: The Harms Do Not Outweigh the Risks

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Despite campaign promises that drug prices would be lowered, the current administration and Congress seem on target for giving pharmaceutical companies more power over pricing, over keeping out competition and over expanding their monopolies. The President’s “Drug Pricing Innovation Working Group” is staffed by many current and former industry lobbyists. While the federal government is deliberating, some states are already acting.

Last week, Nevada passed a law that requires pharmaceutical manufacturers to disclose the prices, profits, and discounts of insulin.…

Source: bioethics.net, a blog maintained by the editorial staff of The American Journal of Bioethics.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.