Bioethics Blogs

Is Involuntary Temporary Reversible Sterilization Always Wrong?

Ever since Janie Valentine’s blog post last week I have been thinking about the problem of repeat drug offenders and their children. My home state is also Tennessee so I read Judge Sam Benningfield’s order (to reduce prison sentences by 30 days for any drug offender willing to “consent” to voluntary temporary sterilization) with particular local and regional interest.

My office practice is on a street with more than one suboxone treatment clinic (a synthetic opioid designed to be used to assist in narcotic withdraw or as a substitute for pain management with less potential for abuse). It is not uncommon for me to see the parking lots of these clinics full of cars, with unsupervised children playing with other unsupervised children in the parking lot while their parents are inside the clinic receiving their treatment. No doubt some of these patients are opioid dependent and not necessarily opioid impaired. My point here is simply to point out the sheer volume of the opioid problem and also to highlight that this represents the families that are doing well. The children are still with their parents and the parents are not (obviously) under the jurisdiction of the court system.

One partner in my practice and his wife are foster parents and have opened their home to children of repeat drug offenders. These children have often been ordered by child protective services to be temporarily removed from their homes because of their parent’s incarceration related to a drug offense or court ordered treatment. The usual placement is a group of 2 or 3 siblings, often with one of the foster children a newborn baby in the throngs of opioid withdrawal.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.