Bioethics Blogs

Appealing to the crowd: ethical justifications in Canadian medical crowdfunding campaigns

Guest Post: Jeremy Snyder
Paper:Appealing to the crowd: ethical justifications in Canadian medical crowdfunding campaigns

Medical crowdfunding is a practice where users take advantage of the power of social networks to raise funds related to medical needs from friends, family, and strangers by sharing fundraising appeals online. Popular venues include GiveForward, GoFundMe, and YouCaring, among others. This practice appears to be growing in terms of the number of active campaigns, the amount of money raised, and its visibility. An analysis of five crowdfunding sites found that in 2015 41% of all fundraising campaigns were for medical needs.

Medical crowdfunding has not received a great deal of scrutiny from ethicists or other academics. We are interested in a number of questions related to medical crowdfunding, including determining what reasons are given by campaigners for potential donors to contribute to their campaigns. In order to answer this question, we recorded and analyzed the language used in 80 medical crowdfunding campaigns, focusing on campaigns by Canadians.

We found that the reasons given for donating can be broken into three groups. First, campaigners used personal appeals to encourage giving, focusing their attention on friends and family members who already knew the recipient. This personal connection to the recipient was often framed as creating a reason to give, such as that “we should gather around them as one big family and help as much as possible.” These appeals can be linked to the ethics of care and relational ethics. Second, the depth of the recipient’s need and resulting positive impact of donations were framed as creating reasons to give.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.