Bioethics Blogs

Surrogacy in the Market of Desire

The State of Florida has spilled no small quantity of ink outlining the legal confines of gestational surrogacy (see particularly sections 742.13-742.17, here).  Legally permitted gestational surrogacy in Florida does not include “bringing in and harboring aliens, sex trafficking of children, forced labor and furthering slave traffic,” however; these charges were leveled against Esthela Clark in 2015. Clark had held a Mexican woman in her one-bedroom apartment, repeatedly inseminating her with semen from Clark’s boyfriend. When the woman failed to become pregnant, she was forced to have sex with two strangers, and placed on a diet restricted to beans.  On 29 March 2017, the 47-year-old Clark from Jacksonville, FL, pled guilty to one count of forced labor. The woman had been forced to clean Clark’s apartment. (See story here.)  What happened to the issues surrounding the smuggling of the woman across the border in order to be a surrogate for Clark and her boyfriend?

On the other side of the globe, India is arguably the world’s leading provider of surrogate mothers, with the industry estimated several years ago as “likely worth $500 million to $2.3 billion.”  India legalized surrogacy in 2002, and is now considering reining in its surrogacy situation:

 

  • The Surrogacy (Regulation) Bill, 2016 was introduced by Minister of Health and Family Welfare, Mr. J. P. Nadda in Lok Sabha on November 21, 2016.  The Bill defines surrogacy as a practice where a woman gives birth to a child for an intending couple and agrees to hand over the child after the birth to the intending couple.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.