Bioethics News

Patient’s own menstrual blood stem cells used to treat Asherman’s syndrome

Infertility treatment.”The best option for endometrial regeneration in patients with Asherman’s syndrome.”

Asherman’s syndrome is an acquired uterine abnormality characterised by the presence of intrauterine adhesions, and which clinically causes infertility, recurrent miscarriages and menstrual changes. Its prevalence ranges between 2% and 22% of infertile women.

Several surgical and medical treatments have been proposed, but outcomes have been unsatisfactory. Now, a study published in Human Reproduction has proposed treating the condition with adult stem cells obtained from the patient’s own menstrual blood.

To date, seven infertile women with Asherman’s syndrome have been treated. All patients were of reproductive age (33.7 ± 1.5 years) and had suffered infertility for 4.8 ± 1.2 years.

Menstrual blood stem cells. The blood stem cells obtained on day 2 of menstruation were transplanted to the uterus, followed by hormone stimulation.

Another successful cell therapy with no ethical difficulties

Endometrial thickening and return to its normal morphology were observed in all patients. One patient became pregnant spontaneously; four others underwent embryo transfer and two of these became pregnant.

The findings of this study suggest that transplantation of adult stem cells obtained from the patient’s own menstrual blood may be one of the best options for endometrial regeneration in patients with Asherman’s syndrome.

This practice — from a bioethical point of view — merits a favourable assessment, since adult stem cells are used which, as we know, present no ethical difficulties for use.

La entrada Patient’s own menstrual blood stem cells used to treat Asherman’s syndrome aparece primero en Bioethics Observatory.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.