Bioethics News

New advances and challenges in the production of human-animal chimeras

They had overcome the obstacle of using human embryonic stem cells, but that even so, a ethical difficulty remained with the producing organs formed almost entirely of human cells in experimental animals.

It seems a little excessive that, in less than two months, we have dedicated three reports to the latest studies by Juan Carlos Izpisúa and his group. Nonetheless, we believe that the importance of his work merits this level of interest.

In our first report, we referred to a study published in Nature, which describes — among other breakthroughs — the production of human-animal chimeras in order to generate quasi-human organs for use in transplantation. In the report, we mentioned the ethical difficulties evident in the study as a result of the use of human embryonic stem cells.

In the second, we discussed the new steps taken in the production of human organs in animals, in connection with an interview by Izpisúa published in Investigación y Ciencia (the Spanish version of Scientific American). In the interview, Izpisúa particularly stressed that, from an ethical point of view, they had overcome the obstacle of using human embryonic stem cells, but that even so, a potential ethical difficulty remained with the possibility of producing organs formed almost entirely of human cells in experimental animals.

Now, we evaluate these experiments by analysing the latest findings published in an article in scientific journal Cell (see HERE).  We also discuss another paper by a different research group, in which the authors also describe the production of human-animal chimeras, likewise with the intention of producing organs for transplantation.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.