Bioethics Blogs

A more ethical form of HIV criminalization

HIV has been criminalized throughout the history of the epidemic, or to be more exact, people living with HIV and their behaviors have been a persistent focus of criminal law. This was undoubtedly due in part to the fact that HIV initially was untreatable and infection (for the vast majority) spelt death. It was terrifying. But it wasn’t just an understandable public health reaction. Criminalization is not necessarily a wise way of controlling an epidemic, as it can be counterproductive, driving underground persons potentially subject to the laws. And there is no way of getting around that those disproportionately affected by HIV (especially in the USA), were considered ‘undesirables’ by many in the public and those leaders they voted for. Criminalization also reflected a moral panic against homosexuals and injection drug users. So, because it was not really based on solid public health principles or scientific evidence in the first place, it is unsurprising that states made laws covering actions highly unlikely to lead to transmission (like spitting or oral sex), fail to take the use of new prevention technologies (PreP, use of antiretrovirals) into account, and often don’t take into consideration the intention to cause harm. What is perhaps more surprising (and depressing) is that many of these laws are still on the books.  

I am thinking that HIV criminalization should not be abolished, but pointed in a better direction. Let me back up. For a few years now, I have been working on a NIH-funded project on the social and ethical dimensions of HIV cure research.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.