Bioethics News

A Lesson From the Henrietta Lacks Story: Science Needs Your Cells

It’s often portrayed as a story of exploitation. Henrietta Lacks, a poor, young African-American woman, learned she had terminal cancer. Cells collected from a biopsy of her cancer were cultured without her knowledge or permission to develop a cell line, called HeLa. Over the ensuing decades, research using HeLa cells led to scores of medical advances, saving lives — and making a lot of money for a lot of people, though not for Ms. Lacks’s family

Source: Bioethics Bulletin by the Berman Institute of Bioethics.

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