Bioethics Blogs

Excuse Me, Doctor, What Exactly Do You Profess?

The late Edmund Pellegrino, M.D., revered medical educator, ethicist, and physician, often made the point that a professional professes something. Merriam-Webster  confirms that the etymology of the word, profession, includes the Latin for “public declaration.”

The Hippocratic Oath, probably penned by members of the Pythagorean sect, according to Ludwig Edelstein (see Ancient Medicine: Selected Papers of Ludwig Edelstein. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1987), has for centuries been accepted as the gold standard for the practice of medicine. Nigel M. deS. Cameron (The New Medicine: Life and Death After Hippocrates. Chicago: Bioethics Press, 2001)
 explicates the Hippocratic Oath as containing four parts:

1.   Covenant with Apollo and others

2.   Duties to teacher

                            Regard teacher as equal to parent

                            Treat him as a partner in livelihood

                            Share money with him when needed

                            Consider his children as siblings

                            Teach medicine to own children, children of teacher, and pupils who take the oath

3.  Duties to patients

                            Use treatment to help the sick, never to injure or wrong them

                            Give no poison to anyone though asked to do so, nor suggest such a plan

                            Give no pessary to cause abortion

                            In purity and in holiness to guard the practitioner’s life and art

                            Use no knife on “sufferers from stone,” but allow others trained to do so

                            Enter houses to help the sick, not to participate in wrong doing or harm

                            Keep oneself from fornication with woman or man, slave or free

                            Not to divulge, but guard as holy secrets those things that are heard by the practitioner

4.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.