Bioethics Blogs

Bioethics and its better self

Renee Fox is one of the most, if not the most, distinguished American sociologists alive. If anything, this makes the attention that she has devoted to bioethics and bioethics workers all the more surprising, because after all, how interesting or important ARE we as subjects? She clearly would not agree with my assessment. She has written a whole book on it (Observing Bioethics, with Judith Swazey), and recently published a talk entitled “Moving bioethics toward its better self: a sociologist’s perspective”, where she clearly and unapologetically has gone from observing bioethics to prescriptively stating what bioethicists ought to be doing. Of course, people telling bioethicists what to do is nothing new. Some make a career out of lumping all bioethicists together and lambasting them as a band of heartless utilitarians promoting a culture of death. Fox is a more astute and gentler critic. For one thing, she apparently thinks bioethics has a ‘better self’, and that it can be nudged in that direction.

So where does Fox think bioethics is now, such that it needs a good nudge? First, its focus is narrow, concentrating on a relatively limited set of phenomena in biology, medicine and medical technology, particularly as they relate to the beginning and end of life. In understanding the ethical issues related to these phenomenon, bioethics goes back to the well of one particular value (autonomy) over and over again, to the neglect of other values like the common good, solidarity and social justice. The comfort zone of bioethics is the individual or interpersonal level of analysis: it appeals strongly to moral imagination (because you can imagine ‘what you would do’ in a certain case) as well as resonating with traditional American individualism.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.