Bioethics Blogs

Hacking CRISPR: Patents, Gene Therapy & Embryos

Bruiseless bananas, vegan cats, pig-to-human transplants, and super-muscular dogs: can you tell the real CRISPR projects from fake ones? It’s getting harder these days, as the latest generation of “gene editing” tools are not only (relatively) quicker, cheaper, and easier than any previous genetic engineering method, but have become “probably the fastest-spreading technology in the history of biology.” As it spreads, researchers the world over are discovering new hacks, complexities, and limitations for CRISPR. Here’s a round-up of recent developments in this booming arena.  

Trending globally: gene editing experiments with human embryos

On April 8, news broke that the second paper documenting CRISPR experiments in human embryos had been published. Researchers at Guangzhou Medical University sought to enhance nonviable embryos leftover from IVF with a naturally occurring mutation that confers HIV resistance: CCR5Δ32.


(Image via Wikimedia: Guangzhou Circle)

The experiments were largely unsuccessful: only 4 of 26 embryos wound up with a copy of the desired mutation, and none had the two copies that would be needed to resist the virus. Mosaicism was also a problem. A year prior in April 2015, the first research using CRISPR in tripronuclear human zygotes was reported by a team at Sun Yat-sen University in the obscure journal Protein & Cell, after Nature and Science turned it down. This second paper was reported in “an obscure reproductive journal” published by the American Society of Reproductive Medicine (the same body that releases non-enforceable guidelines into the void of any regulation over assisted reproductive technologies in the United States).

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.