Bioethics Blogs

CONCUSSION: Bioethics, Foot Ball and Post Traumatic Lies.

Concussion is a documentary biography about medical science’s triumph over a social and corporate conspiracy to suppress evidence of a serious preventable disease. Forensic pathologist, Bennett Omalu, MD, discovered a pathognomonic sign confirming chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). He happened to find it in a cluster of professional football players during autopsies. Concussion was written and directed by Peter Landesman, who managed a riveting story pace, despite most of the visuals occurring in the inglorious world of microscopes and morgues —done to death on television. 

Will Smith’s Dr. Omalu in the lead role is a flawless interpretation of African born Omalu. The supporting cast includes Alec Baldwin, Gugu Mbatha-Raw, Luke Wilson, Albert Brooks, Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje and others. Ridley Scott is the principle producer. This is a heavy hitter production. Though several Black film awards recognized the work, few others have. Perhaps this is because the lead character is a Black man who is not blowing up anything, except the gladiator culture we like to call Football.

Concussion is a gentle story where a brilliant man driven by unflappable moral instinct does the right thing. Others join him, many kicking and screaming, eventually recognizing the effects of repetitive concussions in football and so elsewhere. The fact that this bold faced David and Goliath story, taking on the industry of Football, has had such a poor reception is a shocking, though not a surprising, eyebrow raising event. As the old word play goes, “Denial is more than a river in Africa.” 

Traumatic Brain Injuries from bomb blast during war, car crashes, playing football and other sports, share similar features.(See Going the Distance on this blog.) Exploring Concussion makes viewers understand the randomness of traumatic brain injury (TBI) especially with all those shots of players on the film colliding, pulled from game stock footage.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.