Bioethics News

Antibiotics Built from Scratch

Antibiotics Built from Scratch

May 18, 2016

(Nature) – A 64-year-old class of antibiotics that has been a cornerstone of medical treatment has just refreshed dramatically. More than 300 members have been added to the macrolide class, synthesized from scratch by dogged chemists searching for ways to overcome antibiotic-resistant bacteria. In work described today in Nature, a team of chemists built the drug erythromycin, a key member of the macrolides, from scratch. In doing so, they were able to generate hundreds of variations of the molecule that would not have been feasible by merely modifying erythromycin.

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