Bioethics Blogs

Ethics & Society Newsfeed: March 4, 2016

NIH vowed to move its research chimps from labs, but only 7 got safe haven in 2015
Nearly three years after the National Institutes of Health announced that hundreds of chimpanzees held for invasive medical experiments would be retired to a sanctuary, relatively few have been so lucky. Only seven made the trip in all of 2015.

The Brain Gets Its Day in Court
A new study found that the number of judicial opinions referencing neuroscience as evidence more than doubled between 2005 and 2012.

The Consequences of Poor Science Education in Kindergarten
A majority of low-income and minority kindergarteners come in with poor general science knowledge—and closing that gap may be crucial for ensuring academic success later on.

A Baby, a Baboon Heart, and the Transplant Heard Round the World: The Story of the First Neonatal Cardiac Xenotransplant in History
Stephanie Fae Beauclair, better known to history as Baby Fae, was born October 14, 1984 with hypoplastic left heart syndrome. Baby Fae needed a heart transplant to survive but a human heart was not available to her. What happened next challenged the boundaries of medical science and bioethics.

Harvard’s dark past as the “brain trust” of American eugenics
Harvard University is the richest, most famous and oldest university in the US. But one distinction which it would rather forget is that it was the “brain trust” of American eugenics.

Reproductive Ethics

Women Waiting Longer to Have Children
American women are having their first babies at increasingly older ages

Veterans Seek Help for Infertility Inflicted by Wounds of War
A few thousand veterans, male and female, are infertile because of injuries sustained in combat or training.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.