Bioethics Blogs

Call for Abstracts BIOETHICS: PREPARING FOR THE UNKNOWN

Call for Abstracts

BIOETHICS: PREPARING FOR THE UNKNOWN

March 17-18, 2016; Kalamazoo, Michigan

Overview

The theme of this conference, hosted by Western Michigan University’s Center for the Study of Ethics in Society, highlights uncertainty as a fundamental factor in bioethics.  Invited speakers include Insoo Hyun, associate professor of bioethics and philosophy at Case Western Reserve University, and Richard Sharp, director of the bioethics program at the Mayo Clinic.
Possible topics for submissions include unintended consequences of innovative medical technologies, public health planning for new diseases, incidental findings in clinical research and practice, prevention of medical error, and communication of risk.  Papers on this general theme will be welcomed from a variety of disciplines and perspectives in relation to policy, practice, research, and communication in fields dealing with bioethics.  These fields include, but are not limited to, bioengineering, biology, medicine, nursing, the social sciences and scientific reporting.

Submission guidelines

Submissions will be accepted in the category of formal papers and panel discussions. Submissions are welcome from academic faculty, graduate students, medical students, medical professionals and research teams consisting of any combination of these.
Submissions should be prepared for blind review; please inspect documents and remove personal information before submitting electronically in .doc/.docx or .pdf format to ethicscenter@wmich.edu. Corresponding authors should include names of all authors, as well as their affiliations, and the paper or panel title, on a separate title page. Completed papers or extended abstracts of 500-1,000 words will be considered for paper submissions. For panel discussions, submissions should include an abstract summarizing the overall topic of the panel, as well as separate abstracts for each author’s contribution, for a total of up to 1,000 words.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.