Bioethics Blogs

A Precious Gift: Conversation Ahead of the Crisis

Linda Doolin Ward and Sandra Doolin Aust
Our mother lived through the experience of our grandmother dying from complications of Alzheimer’s Disease. When she received her own Alzheimer’s diagnosis, she sat down with us and had the “talk.” She knew the course of this disease and the decisions we would face as it progressed: increasing need for assistance with daily activities, appropriate precautions to keep her safe, treatment options that she wanted to avoid including feeding tubes and ventilators that she knew from experience would not be helpful. She was very clear about what she did and did not want. Over the next eight years, we were guided by her clear and early direction, even as she lost the ability to speak in the last two years of her life. It was heartbreaking to lose her, especially in this cruel way, but she had given us a precious gift—confidence that we were doing what she would want us to do.  

Medicare on Board

We are heartened, finally, that policymakers are recognizing the value of this gift and the need to make it easier for patients, families and clinicians to have “the talk,” also known as “advance care planning.” 
In September 2014, the National Academy of Medicine (formerly the IOM) released its report, Dying in America. As the NAM website states, “no care decisions are more profound than those made near the end of life” and we have a “responsibility to ensure that end-of-life care is compassionate, affordable, sustainable, and of the best quality possible.”  
Starting in January 2016, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) will activate two payment codes for advance care planning services provided to Medicare beneficiaries by “qualified health professionals.” In paying for these services, CMS takes an important step in enabling seniors and other Medicare beneficiaries to make important decisions that give them control over the type of care they receive and when they receive it. 
As 2,200 people in our region turn 65 each month, the National Academy of Medicine report and Medicare’s new reimbursement policy are both important and timely.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.