Bioethics Blogs

Public Bioethics

In today’s opening session, the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission) turned its attention to facilitating public dialogue about bioethics. Democratic deliberation is a guiding principle of the Bioethics Commission. As outlined in its first report, New Directions: The Ethics of Synthetic Biology and Emerging Technologies, the Bioethics Commission believes that public discussion and debate promote outcomes that are inclusive, thoughtfully considered, and respectful of competing views. Learn more about the Bioethics Commission’s deliberative process in the video: “How does the Bioethics Commission work?”

The Bioethics Commission heard from Dennis Thompson, Ph.D. of Harvard University; Sir Roland Jackson of ScienceWise; Marion Danis, M.D. of the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, and Florence Evans, a participant in the “What’s Next California” deliberative polling exercise.

In Democracy and Disagreement, Thompson has argued that democratic deliberation can allow diverse groups separated by class, race, religion, and gender to explore an issue together in ways that allow their different views to stimulate a richer and more extensive discussion.

In this morning’s session, he pointed to the power of deliberative discussions to reach beyond the particular group or body involved, as people who participate become more interested in keeping the dialogue going in their everyday life.

“Deliberations can be propagated,” he said. “There is a study that found that citizens who participated in deliberative action are more likely to talk about the issues and engage with co-workers in ways they didn’t before, and this was an equal opportunity [engagement]. There was not a bias in favor of class and education.”

Jackson, whose organization, ScienceWise, is focused on fostering broader discussions of significant science and technology concerns in the UK, said it’s important to understand that consensus is not necessarily the goal of deliberative processes.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.