Bioethics Blogs

Medical Photography Exposed- Part 2

In Part 2 of her interview with Katie Grogan, Emily Milam discusses how photography is used in medicine today. For Part I, click here.

 
As a second component to your project, you surveyed dermatologists nationwide about their use and opinion of medical photography. What did you discover about current practices?

Current practices vary depending on the clinical setting and the specialty. I restricted my survey to dermatologists because it is a population that relies on regular use of medical photography. I also chose this group because I do clinical dermatology research, so I have greater access to that population. But plastic surgery and other subspecialties that are particularly visually-oriented also rely on medical photography. To be honest, most fields use medical photography or images in some capacity, whether it’s CT scans, MRIs, endoscopic images during a colonoscopy, intraoperative images of a patient’s abdomen – these are all forms of photography to some extent.

The goal of the study is to better characterize the use of medical photography, including issues of technology, image storage, consent, and patient privacy. Despite its ubiquitous use, little is known about how photography is employed in the clinical setting.

Is there any formal training for medical professionals to encourage universal responsible photography practices?

To my knowledge, there are very few formal training opportunities. There are courses at national meetings, and some residency programs teach basic photography skills. There are also a handful of review articles in academic journals and CME courses that guide readers on how to focus a camera and things to keep in mind while taking photographs.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.