Bioethics Blogs

Pinker tells bioethics what its new moral imperative is, or not

Steven Pinker has written a provocative opinion piece today in the Boston Globe about bioethics. It was apparently sparked by a new technique for editing genomes, namely CRISPR-Cas9, and the social, political and ethical responses to this novel biotechnology. In a nutshell, Pinker states that promising new biotechnologies for improving human health like CRISPR-Cas9 should be aggressively pursued, and ” … the primary moral goal for today’s bioethics can be summarized in a single sentence. Get out of the way.” If bioethicists are not getting out of the way, they are, um, in the way. And if they are in the way, then they are blocking the bonanza of benefits that science could produce. With horrifying results.

My first reaction was: how is this new bioethics skill taught? Should there be classes that teach it in a stepwise manner, i.e. where you first learn not to butt in, then how to just step a bit aside, followed by somewhat getting out of the way, and culminating in totally screwing off? What would the syllabus look like? Wouldn’t avoiding bioethics class altogether be a sign of success?

But seriously, how does Pinker get to this conclusion? Answer: a number of shaky assumptions. The first assumption is that health outcomes are primarily driven by biotechnological advances, rather than (say) non-biomedical driven changes in the social determinants of health. That first and controversial assumption is needed in combination with a second one about bioethics, i.e. thwarting important research is the primary goal of bioethics as it is currently practiced.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.