Bioethics Blogs

International Symposium on Brain Death & Disorders of Consciousness

The Seventh International Symposium on Brain Death and Disorders of Consciousness will be held this December in Havana, Cuba.


















SUBMIT AN ABSTRACT
You can participate in the Symposium as a delegate, although the conference organizers encourage you to submit an abstract.  Deadline for submission of abstracts: September 15, 2015.  Notification of Accepted Abstracts: October 15, 2015.

MAIN TOPICS:  BRAIN DEATH

  • Conceptual approach to human death.
  • BD criteria in different countries.
  • Ancillary tests in BD.
  • Autonomic nervous system assessment in BD.
  • BD in childhood.
  • Anencephalic infants.
  • End-of-life dilemmas: terminal patient, euthanasia, assisted suicide, etc.
  • Legal considerations surrounding BD and related states.
  • Philosophical, theological, sociological, historical and cultural considerations of human death.
  • Organ transplantation.

MAIN TOPICS:  DISORDERS OF CONSCIOUSNESS

  • Pathophysiological mechanisms of consciousness generation.
  • Coma, persistent vegetative state (PVS), minimally conscious state (MCS), and other DOC.
  • Clinical diagnosis of DOC.
  • Neuroimaging techniques for assessing DOC.
  • Neurophysiologic tests for assessing DOC.
  • Autonomic nervous system assessment of DOC.
  • Neurorehabilitation of DOC.
  • Neuroprotection and Neuromonitoring of DOC.
  • New trends in cardio-pulmonar-cerebral resuscitation.

AMERICAN CITIZENS CAN LEGALLY ATTEND
After the announcement of the re-establishment of USA and Cuba diplomatic relationships, US citizens DO NOT require requesting special permissions to attend a meeting in Cuba, because they can attend any conference in Cuba that relates to the traveler’s profession, professional background, or area of expertise, including graduate-level full-time study.

GENERAL DESCRIPTION
Although inserted into a worldwide debate, the acceptance that a human being with irreversible loss of brain functions is dead has been progressively accepted beginning as far back as the late 1950’s.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.