Bioethics Blogs

A Step Toward a Cultural Transformation in the Way Pain is Perceived, Judged and Treated

The following blog post is the executive summary of the June 29-30, 2015, PAINS Collaborators Meeting in Washington, DC, held in response to Department of Health and Human Services’ publication of the National Pain Strategy Report. 

BACKGROUND

In anticipation of publication of the National Pain Strategy (NPS) Report, in June 2015 the Pain Action Alliance to Implement a National Strategy (PAINS), a coalition of national leaders and organizations committed to advancing the sixteen recommendations made in the Institutes of Medicine’s report, Relieving Pain in America: A Blueprint for Transforming Prevention, Care, Education and Research, convened a Collaborators Conference in Washington, DC. The purpose of the meeting was to discern opportunities and challenges to implementation of the report, to build enthusiasm for it and promote collaboration among attendees in order to move the NPS Report from a vision to a reality. More than 100 prominent leaders from professional societies, academic institutions, federal agencies, patient advocacy groups, and policy organizations met to review the NPS Report and discuss each of its six sections.

In April 2015, the NPS Report underwent preliminary review by multiple federal agencies and was then posted in the Federal Register for public commentary. In opening remarks, Walter Koroshetz, Director of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), told attendees that more than 770 responses were received and the plan is expected to be released in the late summer/early fall. Expectations for it are high. The report’s vision states, “If the objectives of the National Pain Strategy are achieved, the nation would see a decrease in prevalence across the continuum of pain, from acute, to chronic, to high-impact chronic pain, and across the life span from pediatric through geriatric populations, to end of life, which would reduce the burden of pain for individuals, families, and society as a whole.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.