Bioethics Blogs

What Physicians Can Learn from Veterinarians

Photo Credit: Rebecca Plevin / Marketplace

A while back, I linked to a story by Rebecca Plevin, out of California Public Radio, on the challenge of discussing health care costs.  Well, she has tuned up that piece and placed it on Marketplace. Here is a print version:

When a doctor prescribes a medication, most of us don’t ask how much it’ll cost. It makes sense: for a lot of people – both doctors and patients – talking about the cost of care is a totally foreign concept.

Peter Ubel is the perfect person to explain why that is. He’s a physician who now teaches at Duke University, specializing in the overlap of ethics, behavioral economics and medicine.

“Not that long ago, if a person had insurance, they had really good insurance that covered the vast majority of the expenses,” Ubel says. “So there really wasn’t much to talk about when it came to money.”

But these days there’s a lot more to talk about. The Kaiser Family Foundation says last year, 80 percent of people who got insurance through their job still faced an annual deductible that could run as high as $3,000 or more.

That means we all have skin in the game now, Ubel says.

“When the doctor recommends one medication to us, we might have reason now to ask whether another medicine would be almost as good and a lot cheaper,” he explains.

That type of conversation is still rare, but it is happening in at least one medical field.

At Mohawk Alley Animal Hospital in Los Angeles, Dr.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.