Bioethics Blogs

Cortney Davis – When the Nurse Becomes a Patient: A Story in Words and Images – Part I

A dialogue with Art Editor Laura Ferguson

Carol Donley, in her annotation of Cortney’s book in the LitMed Database, writes that “the vivid paintings speak for themselves, and they add a different way of knowing not available through words.” As an artist whose work explores the experiences of her own body, I believe strongly in the power of art to express things that can’t be as easily communicated in other ways, especially about experiences that go deep, like illness, pain, and isolation. Because Cortney is both a medical professional and a wonderful writer, I welcomed the opportunity for a dialogue with her about the expressive power of visual art.

Laura: You chose painting to express your feelings about the experience of being a patient, even though you are also a writer and poet. Can you say more about why it felt more right to express yourself without words? Do you think it was because the experience was so physical, so much about the body? For me, drawing seems to come directly from my body – it allows my body to express itself directly, through my hand. Is that how it felt for you?

Cortney: I didn’t really choose painting, rather it sort of chose me. When I was finally discharged after the second hospitalization my friends wondered if I was going to write about my experience. I felt the need to respond to my illness in some creative way (maybe turning illness into something creative is a way of taking control?), but I really could not find the words.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.