Bioethics Blogs

Residual Dried Blood and New Born Screening in Minnesota

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by Courtney Jarboe, Bioethics Program Student

In Minnesota, residual dried blood (RDB) samples collected for newborn screening had been stored, retained, and used for research without parental consent. It had been presumed that the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) had the statutory authority to do so. In 2011, the Minnesota Supreme Court ruled (in the case of Bearder v. Minnesota) that the newborn screening program was subject to the Genetic Privacy Act (2006) (pdf), which requires written consent for secondary uses of genetic information. This ruling led to revisions of newborn screening legislation and the destruction of 1.1 million newborn screening RDB samples. Since the legislative dust has settled, MDH has begun aggressive educational campaigns to rebuild trust and awareness between parents and healthcare providers in Minnesota and address information gaps in the public’s understanding of the newborn screening program and the associated research.

In February of this year, I received a letter from the Citizen’s Council for Health Freedom (CCHF), an organization that actively supported the nine families in Bearder v. Minnesota who sued to stop the use of RDB samples for research. (see image) The letter details CCHF’s concerns about the MDH newborn screening program. The letter also suggests that MDH can use the RDB and the associated child’s DNA without parent consent. Included with the letter were a letter addressed to MDH and a copy of the MDH ‘Directive to Destroy’ form.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.