Bioethics Blogs

A Not-So-Open Discussion

Courtney Thiele posted on March 3oth about an article in the Washington Post describing “a new push to de-stigmatize the nation’s most controversial medical procedure by talking about it openly and unapologetically.” A clinic in Maryland called “Carafem” dispenses abortion pills, and “promises a ‘spa-like’ experience for women with an open and unabashed approach to pregnancy termination.” (quotations from the Washington Post’s article)

This clinic is no doubt trying to move the experience of abortion as far away from Gosnellian horrors as possible. But despite the claims of the owners (and the Washington Post), their own terms reveal that it is not openness they seek, but a façade to hide the truth.

Whenever we hear the term “stigma,” we know that we’re getting lectured about judgmental people who are imposing their bad thoughts, and seeking to infringe upon someone’s freedom. The term in medical use describes a “mark” due to some condition, and therefore a natural consequence and characteristic identifier. In non-medical parlance, it has come to represent an externally imposed non-physical mark, unfairly applied.

For those wishing to deflect criticism, this is a useful word. It serves to convey the impression that if we feel anything negative about an entity or act, it is the fault of external forces, usually having malevolent intent. “Stigma” becomes a surrogate—a strawman—for “guilt” and “shame.” The founders of this clinic, of course, are trying to sell abortion, and trying to blame the guilt that participants may feel on judgmental others.

Most revealing is the clinic staff’s use of a term describing the abortion itself.

The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University.